Community Mental Health Journal

, Volume 52, Issue 5, pp 519–526

Suicidal Ideation Among Adults with Disability in Western Canada: A Brief Report

  • David McConnell
  • Lyndsey Hahn
  • Amber Savage
  • Camille Dubé
  • Elly Park
Brief Report

DOI: 10.1007/s10597-015-9911-3

Cite this article as:
McConnell, D., Hahn, L., Savage, A. et al. Community Ment Health J (2016) 52: 519. doi:10.1007/s10597-015-9911-3

Abstract

This study investigated prevalence and risk factors for suicidal ideation among adults with self-reported disability in Western Canada. The method was secondary data analysis utilising the Canadian Community Health Survey. The odds of 12-month suicidal ideation are 3.5 times greater for adults with self-reported disability compared with non-disabled adults, controlling for age, sex, ethnicity, and psychiatric morbidity. The heightened risk of ideation among adults with self-reported disability is partially explained by social adversity, including food insecurity and low sense of community belonging. Reducing suicide risk among adults with disability requires a broad-spectrum approach, including mental health care, and strategies to ameliorate social and economic hardship.

Keywords

Suicide Ideation Disability Cognitive impairment Psychiatric morbidity 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • David McConnell
    • 1
  • Lyndsey Hahn
    • 1
  • Amber Savage
    • 1
  • Camille Dubé
    • 1
  • Elly Park
    • 1
  1. 1.Family and Disability Studies Initiative, Faculty of Rehabilitation MedicineUniversity of AlbertaEdmontonCanada

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