Conservation Genetics

, Volume 10, Issue 4, pp 909–914

mtDNA indicates profound population structure in Indian tiger (Panthera tigris tigris)

Authors

  • Reeta Sharma
    • Unit of Evolutionary Biology/Systematic Zoology, Institute of Biochemistry and BiologyUniversity of Potsdam
    • Wildlife Institute of India
  • Heiko Stuckas
    • Unit of Evolutionary Biology/Systematic Zoology, Institute of Biochemistry and BiologyUniversity of Potsdam
  • Ranjana Bhaskar
    • Wildlife Institute of India
  • Sandeep Rajput
    • Wildlife Institute of India
  • Imran Khan
    • Wildlife Institute of India
  • Surendra Prakash Goyal
    • Wildlife Institute of India
    • Unit of Evolutionary Biology/Systematic Zoology, Institute of Biochemistry and BiologyUniversity of Potsdam
Short Communication

DOI: 10.1007/s10592-008-9568-3

Cite this article as:
Sharma, R., Stuckas, H., Bhaskar, R. et al. Conserv Genet (2009) 10: 909. doi:10.1007/s10592-008-9568-3

Abstract

We analyzed mtDNA polymorphisms (parts of control region, ND5, ND2, Cytb, 12S, together 902 bp) in 59 scat and 18 tissue samples from 13 Indian populations of the critically endangered Indian tiger (Panthera tigris tigris), along with zoo animals as reference. Northern tiger populations exhibit two unique haplotypes suggesting genetic isolation. Western populations from Sariska (extinct in 2004) and Ranthambore are genetically similar, such that Ranthambore could serve as a source for reintroduction in Sariska. Zoo populations maintain mitochondrial lineages that are rare or absent in the wild.

Keywords

Conservation Indian tiger mtDNA Population genetics Scat

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008