Climatic Change

, Volume 132, Issue 2, pp 295–306

Historical and experimental evidence for enhanced concentration of artemesinin, a global anti-malarial treatment, with recent and projected increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide

  • C. Zhu
  • Q. Zeng
  • A. McMichael
  • K. L. Ebi
  • K. Ni
  • A. S. Khan
  • J. Zhu
  • G. Liu
  • X. Zhang
  • Lei Cheng
  • L.H. Ziska
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10584-015-1421-3

Cite this article as:
Zhu, C., Zeng, Q., McMichael, A. et al. Climatic Change (2015) 132: 295. doi:10.1007/s10584-015-1421-3

Abstract

Although the role of rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration [CO2] on plant growth and fecundity is widely acknowledged as important within the scientific community; less research is available regarding the impact of [CO2] on secondary plant compounds, even though such compounds can play a significant role in human health. At present, Artemisia annua, an annual plant species native to China, is widely recognized as the primary source of artemesinin used in artemesinin combination therapies or ACTs. ACTs, in turn, are used globally for the treatment of simple Plasmodium falciparum malaria, the predominant form of malaria in Africa. In this study, artemesinin concentration was quantified for multiple A. annua populations in China using a free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) system as a function of [CO2]-induced changes both in situ and as a function of the foliar ratio of carbon to nitrogen (C:N). The high correlation between artemesinin concentration and C:N allowed an historical examination of A. annua leaves collected at 236 locations throughout China from 1905 through 2009. Both the historical and experimental data indicate that increases in artemesinin foliar concentration are likely to continue in parallel with the ongoing increase in atmospheric [CO2]. The basis for the [CO2]-induced increase in artemesinin is unclear, but could be related to the carbon: nutrient hypothesis of Bryant et al. (1983). Overall, these data provide the first evidence that historic and projected increases in atmospheric [CO2] may be associated with global changes in artemesinin chemistry, potentially allowing a greater quantity of drug available for the same area of cultivation.

Supplementary material

10584_2015_1421_MOESM1_ESM.docx (33 kb)
Table S1(DOCX 33 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht (outside the USA) 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Zhu
    • 1
  • Q. Zeng
    • 2
  • A. McMichael
    • 3
  • K. L. Ebi
    • 4
  • K. Ni
    • 1
  • A. S. Khan
    • 5
  • J. Zhu
    • 1
  • G. Liu
    • 1
  • X. Zhang
    • 6
  • Lei Cheng
    • 7
  • L.H. Ziska
    • 8
  1. 1.State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable AgricultureChinese Academy of SciencesNanjingPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Jiangsu Institute of BotanyChinese Academy of ScienceNanjingPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.College of Medicine, Biology and EnvironmentAustralian National UniversityCanberraAustralia
  4. 4.School of Public HealthUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA
  5. 5.College of Public HealthUniversity of Nebraska Medical CenterOmahaUSA
  6. 6.The Herbarium, State Key Laboratory of Systematic and Evolutionary Botany, Institute of BotanyChinese Academy of SciencesBeijingPeople’s Republic of China
  7. 7.College of Life SciencesZhejiang UniversityHangzhouChina
  8. 8.USDA-ARS, Crop Systems and Global Change LabBeltsvilleUSA