Climatic Change

, Volume 132, Issue 2, pp 223–235

An integrated assessment of water-energy and climate change in sacramento, california: how strong is the nexus?

  • Larry L. Dale
  • Nihan Karali
  • Dev Millstein
  • Mike Carnall
  • Sebastian Vicuña
  • Nicolas Borchers
  • Eduardo Bustos
  • Joe O’Hagan
  • David Purkey
  • Charles Heaps
  • Jack Sieber
  • William D. Collins
  • Michael D. Sohn
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10584-015-1370-x

Cite this article as:
Dale, L.L., Karali, N., Millstein, D. et al. Climatic Change (2015) 132: 223. doi:10.1007/s10584-015-1370-x

Abstract

This paper is among the first to report on the full integration of basin-scale models that include projections of the demand and supply of water and energy for residential, commercial, industrial, and agricultural sector users. We link two widely used regional planning models that allow one to study the impact of rising climate variability on water and electricity use in Sacramento, California. Historic data combined with the current energy and water system configuration was used to assess the implications of changes in temperature and precipitation. Climate simulations suggest that electricity imports to the region would increase during hot dry spells, when regional power production is most constrained. In particular, regional imports of electricity would increase over 35 % in hot dry years, assuming a 4 °C increase in average temperature and a 25 % decrease in average precipitation.

Supplementary material

10584_2015_1370_MOESM1_ESM.xlsx (19 kb)
ESM 1(XLSX 18 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Larry L. Dale
    • 1
  • Nihan Karali
    • 1
  • Dev Millstein
    • 1
  • Mike Carnall
    • 1
  • Sebastian Vicuña
    • 2
  • Nicolas Borchers
    • 2
  • Eduardo Bustos
    • 2
  • Joe O’Hagan
    • 3
  • David Purkey
    • 4
    • 5
  • Charles Heaps
    • 4
    • 5
  • Jack Sieber
    • 4
    • 5
  • William D. Collins
    • 6
  • Michael D. Sohn
    • 1
  1. 1.Lawrence Berkeley National LaboratoryEnergy Technologies AreaBerkeleyUSA
  2. 2.Centro Interdisciplinario de Cambio GlobalPontificia Universidad Catolica de ChileSantiagoChile
  3. 3.California Energy CommissionSacramentoUSA
  4. 4.Stockholm Environment InstituteCambridgeUSA
  5. 5.Stockholm Environment InstituteDavisUSA
  6. 6.Lawrence Berkeley National LaboratoryEarth Science DivisionBerkeleyUSA