Article

Climatic Change

, Volume 129, Issue 3, pp 555-571

Open Access This content is freely available online to anyone, anywhere at any time.

BioEarth: Envisioning and developing a new regional earth system model to inform natural and agricultural resource management

  • Jennifer C. AdamAffiliated withWashington State University Email author 
  • , Jennie C. StephensAffiliated withClark University
  • , Serena H. ChungAffiliated withWashington State University
  • , Michael P. BradyAffiliated withWashington State University
  • , R. David EvansAffiliated withWashington State University
  • , Chad E. KrugerAffiliated withWashington State University
  • , Brian K. LambAffiliated withWashington State University
  • , Mingliang LiuAffiliated withWashington State University
  • , Claudio O. StöckleAffiliated withWashington State University
    • , Joseph K. VaughanAffiliated withWashington State University
    • , Kirti RajagopalanAffiliated withWashington State University
    • , John A. HarrisonAffiliated withWashington State University
    • , Christina L. TagueAffiliated withUniversity of California
    • , Ananth KalyanaramanAffiliated withWashington State University
    • , Yong ChenAffiliated withOregon State University
    • , Alex GuentherAffiliated withWashington State UniversityPacific Northwest National Laboratory
    • , Fok-Yan LeungAffiliated withWashington State University
    • , L. Ruby LeungAffiliated withPacific Northwest National Laboratory
    • , Andrew B. PerlebergAffiliated withWashington State University
    • , Jonathan YoderAffiliated withWashington State University
    • , Elizabeth AllenAffiliated withWashington State University
    • , Sarah AndersonAffiliated withWashington State University
    • , Bhagyam ChandrasekharanAffiliated withWashington State University
    • , Keyvan MalekAffiliated withWashington State University
    • , Tristan MullisAffiliated withWashington State University
    • , Cody MillerAffiliated withWashington State University
    • , Tsengel NerguiAffiliated withWashington State University
    • , Justin PoinsatteAffiliated withWashington State University
    • , Julian ReyesAffiliated withWashington State University
    • , Jun ZhuAffiliated withUniversity of California
    • , Janet S. ChoateAffiliated withUniversity of California
    • , Xiaoyan JiangAffiliated withNational Center for Atmospheric Research
    • , Roger NelsonAffiliated withWashington State University
    • , Jin-Ho YoonAffiliated withPacific Northwest National Laboratory
    • , Georgine G. YorgeyAffiliated withWashington State University
    • , Kristen JohnsonAffiliated withWashington State University
    • , Kiran J. ChinnayakanahalliAffiliated withWashington State UniversityAIR Worldwide
    • , Alan F. HamletAffiliated withWashington State UniversityNotre Dame University
    • , Bart NijssenAffiliated withWashington State UniversityUniversity of Washington
    • , Von WaldenAffiliated withWashington State University

Abstract

As managers of agricultural and natural resources are confronted with uncertainties in global change impacts, the complexities associated with the interconnected cycling of nitrogen, carbon, and water present daunting management challenges. Existing models provide detailed information on specific sub-systems (e.g., land, air, water, and economics). An increasing awareness of the unintended consequences of management decisions resulting from interconnectedness of these sub-systems, however, necessitates coupled regional earth system models (EaSMs). Decision makers’ needs and priorities can be integrated into the model design and development processes to enhance decision-making relevance and “usability” of EaSMs. BioEarth is a research initiative currently under development with a focus on the U.S. Pacific Northwest region that explores the coupling of multiple stand-alone EaSMs to generate usable information for resource decision-making. Direct engagement between model developers and non-academic stakeholders involved in resource and environmental management decisions throughout the model development process is a critical component of this effort. BioEarth utilizes a bottom-up approach for its land surface model that preserves fine spatial-scale sensitivities and lateral hydrologic connectivity, which makes it unique among many regional EaSMs. This paper describes the BioEarth initiative and highlights opportunities and challenges associated with coupling multiple stand-alone models to generate usable information for agricultural and natural resource decision-making.