Climatic Change

, Volume 123, Issue 3, pp 719–730

Bio-electricity and land use in the Future Agricultural Resources Model (FARM)

Authors

    • Economic Research ServiceU.S. Department of Agriculture
  • Hannah Förster
    • Öko-Institut
  • Carol A. Jones
    • Economic Research ServiceU.S. Department of Agriculture
  • Katja Schumacher
    • Öko-Institut
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10584-013-0943-9

Cite this article as:
Sands, R.D., Förster, H., Jones, C.A. et al. Climatic Change (2014) 123: 719. doi:10.1007/s10584-013-0943-9

Abstract

Bio-electricity is an important technology for Energy Modeling Forum (EMF-27) mitigation scenarios, especially with the possibility of negative carbon dioxide emissions when combined with carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS). With a strong economic foundation, and broad coverage of economic activity, computable general equilibrium models have proven useful for analysis of alternative climate change policies. However, embedding energy technologies in a general equilibrium model is a challenge, especially for a negative emissions technology with joint products of electricity and carbon dioxide storage. We provide a careful implementation of bio-electricity with CCS in a general equilibrium context, and apply it to selected EMF-27 mitigation scenarios through 2100. Representing bio-electricity and its land requirements requires consideration of competing land uses, including crops, pasture, and forests. Land requirements for bio-electricity start at 200 kilohectares per terawatt-hour declining to approximately 70 kilohectares per terwatt-hour by year 2100 in scenarios with high bioenergy potential.

Abbreviations

AgMIP

Agricultural Model Inter-comparison and Improvement Project

CCS

Carbon dioxide capture and storage

CES

Constant elasticity of substitution

CGE

Computable general equilibrium

EMF

Energy Modeling Forum

EV

Equivalent variation

FARM

Future Agricultural Resources Model

FAO

Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

GTAP

Global Trade Analysis Project

IEA

International Energy Agency

kha

Kilohectare

SAM

Social accounting matrix

SSP

Shared Socio-economic Pathway

TWh

Terawatt-hour

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht (outside the USA) 2013