Climatic Change

, Volume 118, Issue 2, pp 321–337

Learning with practitioners: climate change adaptation priorities in a Canadian community

  • Ian M. Picketts
  • John Curry
  • Stephen J. Déry
  • Stewart J. Cohen
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10584-012-0653-8

Cite this article as:
Picketts, I.M., Curry, J., Déry, S.J. et al. Climatic Change (2013) 118: 321. doi:10.1007/s10584-012-0653-8
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Abstract

Adaptation is already a necessary response to climate change for northern communities. The City of Prince George, in British Columbia, Canada, has been adjusting to impacts for years and there is a high level of local awareness of climate change. The purpose of this study was to collaborate with City staff and other organizations to undertake action-oriented research with the goal of creating a local adaptation strategy. Steps taken toward this goal included: producing downscaled climate scenarios; facilitating a workshop with local practitioners to prioritize impacts; gathering public feedback regarding impacts; and triangulating sources of information to determine community adaptation priorities. Changes to forests and increased flooding are the top local adaptation priorities, and impacts related to transportation, severe weather and water supply are high priorities. Other impacts, such as health effects and agricultural changes, are also important but did not rank highly using a risk framework focused on negative physical effects. Local impacts, actions the City is undertaking to address them and suggestions for implementing adaptation measures are summarized. The process of creating an adaptation strategy has proven highly valuable in Prince George and has precipitated further engagement and action. Due to the low profile of adaptation and limited resources in many communities, researchers and practitioners must capitalize on opportunities to incorporate adaptation into existing plans and processes. Lessons from the Prince George experience can be applied to other communities as they strive to effectively adapt to climate change.

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ian M. Picketts
    • 1
  • John Curry
    • 2
  • Stephen J. Déry
    • 3
  • Stewart J. Cohen
    • 4
  1. 1.University of Northern British Columbia (BC)Prince GeorgeCanada
  2. 2.School of Environmental PlanningUniversity of Northern BCPrince GeorgeCanada
  3. 3.Environmental Science and Engineering ProgramUniversity of Northern BCPrince GeorgeCanada
  4. 4.Adaptation and Impacts Research SectionEnvironment Canada, and University of BCVancouverCanada

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