Climatic Change

, Volume 99, Issue 3, pp 637–645

Sources of spread in simulations of Arctic sea ice loss over the twenty-first century

A letter
Open AccessLetter

DOI: 10.1007/s10584-010-9809-6

Cite this article as:
Boé, J., Hall, A. & Qu, X. Climatic Change (2010) 99: 637. doi:10.1007/s10584-010-9809-6


We show that intermodel variations in the anthropogenically-forced evolution of September sea ice extent (SSIE) in the Arctic stem mainly from two factors: the baseline climatological sea ice thickness (SIT) distribution, and the local climate feedback parameter. The roles of these two factors evolve over the course of the twenty-first century. The SIT distribution is the most important factor in current trends and those of coming decades, accounting for roughly half the intermodel variations in SSIE trends. Then, its role progressively decreases, so that around the middle of the twenty-first century the local climate feedback parameter becomes the dominant factor. Through this analysis, we identify the investments in improved simulation of Arctic climate necessary to reduce uncertainties both in projections of sea ice loss over the coming decades and in the ultimate fate of the ice pack.

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© The Author(s) 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic SciencesUniversity of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA