Cancer Causes & Control

, Volume 20, Issue 3, pp 269–278

Validation of a food frequency questionnaire measurement of dietary acrylamide intake using hemoglobin adducts of acrylamide and glycidamide

  • Kathryn M. Wilson
  • Hubert W. Vesper
  • Paula Tocco
  • Laura Sampson
  • Johan Rosén
  • Karl-Erik Hellenäs
  • Margareta Törnqvist
  • Walter C. Willett
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10552-008-9241-7

Cite this article as:
Wilson, K.M., Vesper, H.W., Tocco, P. et al. Cancer Causes Control (2009) 20: 269. doi:10.1007/s10552-008-9241-7

Abstract

Objective

Acrylamide, a probable human carcinogen, is formed during high-heat cooking of many common foods. The validity of food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) measures of acrylamide intake has not been established. We assessed the validity of acrylamide intake calculated from an FFQ using a biomarker of acrylamide exposure.

Methods

We calculated acrylamide intake from an FFQ in the Nurses’ Health Study II. We measured hemoglobin adducts of acrylamide and its metabolite, glycidamide, in a random sample of 342 women. Correlation and regression analyses were used to assess the relationship between acrylamide intakes and adducts.

Results

The correlation between acrylamide intake and the sum of acrylamide and glycidamide adducts was 0.31 (95% CI: 0.20–0.41), adjusted for laboratory batch, energy intake, and age. Further adjustment for BMI, alcohol intake, and correction for random within-person measurement error in adducts gave a correlation of 0.34 (CI: 0.23–0.45). The intraclass correlation coefficient for the sum of adducts was 0.77 in blood samples collected 1–3 years apart in a subset of 45 women. Intake of several foods significantly predicted adducts in multiple regression.

Conclusions

Acrylamide intake and hemoglobin adducts of acrylamide and glycidamide were moderately correlated. Within-person consistency in adducts was high over time.

Keywords

AcrylamideGlycidamideDietHemoglobin adducts

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kathryn M. Wilson
    • 1
    • 2
  • Hubert W. Vesper
    • 3
  • Paula Tocco
    • 2
  • Laura Sampson
    • 2
  • Johan Rosén
    • 4
  • Karl-Erik Hellenäs
    • 4
  • Margareta Törnqvist
    • 5
  • Walter C. Willett
    • 1
    • 2
    • 6
  1. 1.Department of EpidemiologyHarvard School of Public HealthBostonUSA
  2. 2.Department of NutritionHarvard School of Public HealthBostonUSA
  3. 3.Division of Laboratory SciencesNational Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionAtlantaUSA
  4. 4.Swedish National Food AdministrationUppsalaSweden
  5. 5.Department Environmental ChemistryStockholm UniversityStockholmSweden
  6. 6.Channing Laboratory, Department of MedicineBrigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA