Cancer Causes & Control

, Volume 20, Issue 1, pp 57–65

A population-based, case–control study of green tea consumption and leukemia risk in southwestern Taiwan

Authors

    • Environmental and Occupational Medicine and Epidemiology Program, Department of Environmental HealthHarvard School of Public Health
    • Department of Occupational and Environmental MedicineKaohsiung Veterans General Hospital
    • Department of Emergency MedicineKaohsiung Veterans General Hospital
  • Chu-Ling Yu
    • Environmental and Occupational Medicine and Epidemiology Program, Department of Environmental HealthHarvard School of Public Health
  • Chen-Yu Liu
    • Environmental and Occupational Medicine and Epidemiology Program, Department of Environmental HealthHarvard School of Public Health
  • Su-Fen Wang
    • Department of GeographyNational Changhua University of Education
  • Pi-Chen Pan
    • Yuh-Ing Junior College of Health Care & Management
  • Ming-Tsang Wu
    • School of Public Health, Kaohsiung Medical University
  • Chi-Kung Ho
    • School of Public Health, Kaohsiung Medical University
  • Yu-Shing Lo
    • Department of Pathology and Laboratory MedicineKaohsiung Veterans General Hospital
  • Yi Li
    • Department of BiostatisticsHarvard School of Public Health
  • David C. Christiani
    • Environmental and Occupational Medicine and Epidemiology Program, Department of Environmental HealthHarvard School of Public Health
    • Department of EpidemiologyHarvard School of Public Health
    • Pulmonary and Critical Care Unit, Department of MedicineMassachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School
  • the Kaohsiung Leukemia Research Group
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10552-008-9217-7

Cite this article as:
Kuo, Y., Yu, C., Liu, C. et al. Cancer Causes Control (2009) 20: 57. doi:10.1007/s10552-008-9217-7

Abstract

Objective

This study investigated the association between green tea consumption and leukemia.

Methods

A total of 252 cases (90.3% response) and 637 controls (53.4% response) were enrolled. Controls were matched for cases on age and gender. Information was collected on participants’ living habits, including tea consumption. Green tea was used as a standard to estimate the total amount of individual catechin consumption. We stratified individual consumption of catechins into four levels. Conditional logistic regression models were fit to subjects aged 0–15 and 16–29 years to evaluate separate associations between leukemia and catechin consumption.

Results

A significant inverse association between green tea consumption and leukemia risk was found in individuals aged 16–29 years, whereas no significant association was found in the younger age groups. For the older group with higher amounts of tea consumption (>550 units of catechins), the adjusted odds ratio (OR) compared with the group without tea consumption was 0.47 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.23–0.97]. After we adjusted for smoking status and medical irradiation exposure, the overall OR for all participants was 0.49 (95% CI = 0.27–0.91), indicating an inverse relation between large amounts of catechins and leukemia.

Conclusion

Drinking sufficient amounts of tea, especially green tea, which contains more catechins than oolong tea and black tea, may reduce the risk of leukemia.

Keywords

AsiaCatechinChildhood LeukemiaEpidemiologyGreen Tea

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008