Cancer Causes & Control

, Volume 19, Issue 9, pp 895–907

A review of the relationship between tooth loss, periodontal disease, and cancer

  • Mara S. Meyer
  • Kaumudi Joshipura
  • Edward Giovannucci
  • Dominique S. Michaud
Review Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10552-008-9163-4

Cite this article as:
Meyer, M.S., Joshipura, K., Giovannucci, E. et al. Cancer Causes Control (2008) 19: 895. doi:10.1007/s10552-008-9163-4

Abstract

Recent studies have investigated the association between periodontal disease, tooth loss, and several systemic diseases including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and preterm birth. Periodontal disease, a chronic inflammatory condition, is highly prevalent in adult populations around the world, and may be preventable. Estimates of prevalence vary between races and geographic regions, with a marked increase in the occurrence of periodontal disease with advancing age. Worldwide estimates for the prevalence of severe periodontal disease generally range from 10 to 15%. The relationship between oral health and cancer has been examined for a number of specific cancer sites. Several studies have reported associations between periodontal disease or tooth loss and risk of oral, upper gastrointestinal, lung, and pancreatic cancer in different populations. In a number of studies, these associations persisted after adjustment for major risk factors, including cigarette smoking and socioeconomic status. This review provides a summary of these findings, discusses possible biological mechanisms involved, and raises methodological issues related to studying these relationships.

Keywords

Periodontal diseases Tooth loss Cancer 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mara S. Meyer
    • 1
  • Kaumudi Joshipura
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Edward Giovannucci
    • 1
    • 4
    • 5
  • Dominique S. Michaud
    • 1
    • 6
  1. 1.Department of EpidemiologyHarvard School of Public HealthBostonUSA
  2. 2.School of DentistryUniversity of Puerto RicoSan JanPuerto Rico
  3. 3.Department of Oral Health Policy and EpidemiologyHarvard School of Dental MedicineBostonUSA
  4. 4.Department of NutritionHarvard School of Public HealthBostonUSA
  5. 5.Channing Laboratory, Department of MedicineBrigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  6. 6.Department of Epidemiology and Public HealthImperial CollegeLondonUK

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