Biomedical Microdevices

, Volume 15, Issue 4, pp 635–643

Proliferation and migration of tumor cells in tapered channels

Authors

  • Yuan Wan
    • Nano-Bio LabUniversity of Texas at Arlington
    • Department of BioengineeringUniversity of Texas at Arlington
    • Nanotechnology Research and Education CenterUniversity of Texas at Arlington
    • Mawson InstituteUniversity of South Australia
  • Deepika Tamuly
    • Department of BioengineeringUniversity of Texas at Arlington
  • Peter B. Allen
    • Institute for Cell and Molecular BiologyUniversity of Texas at Austin
  • Young-tae Kim
    • Department of BioengineeringUniversity of Texas at Arlington
    • Nanotechnology Research and Education CenterUniversity of Texas at Arlington
  • Robert Bachoo
    • Annette G. Strauss Center for Neuro-OncologyUniversity of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
    • Department of NeurologyUniversity of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
    • Department of Internal MedicineUniversity of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
  • Andrew D. Ellington
    • Institute for Cell and Molecular BiologyUniversity of Texas at Austin
    • Nano-Bio LabUniversity of Texas at Arlington
    • Department of BioengineeringUniversity of Texas at Arlington
    • Nanotechnology Research and Education CenterUniversity of Texas at Arlington
    • Department of Electrical EngineeringUniversity of Texas at Arlington
    • Joint Graduate Committee of Bioengineering Program, University of Texas at Arlington and University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at DallasUniversity of Texas at Arlington
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10544-012-9721-0

Cite this article as:
Wan, Y., Tamuly, D., Allen, P.B. et al. Biomed Microdevices (2013) 15: 635. doi:10.1007/s10544-012-9721-0

Abstract

Tumor cells depict two deviant tendencies; over-proliferation and vigorous migration. A tapered channel device is designed and fabricated for in vitro studies. We report inhibited proliferation and migration of human glioblastoma (hGBM) cells when exposed to an aptamer that is known to bind epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR). The device is integrated with controlled ambient and microscope for providing real-time and quantitative characterization of the tumor cell behavior. The results show that hGBM cells loose proliferation and motility when exposed to the anti-EGFR aptamer. The aptamer directly inhibits and blocks EGF-induced EGFR phosphorylation. This also reduces the ability of cells to remodel their internal structure for invasion through narrow constrictions. This provides a framework for possible studies on efficacy of other inhibiting molecules.

Keywords

Inhibition of cancerMicrofluidicsTapered channelsAggressive migration

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2012