Biodiversity and Conservation

, Volume 22, Issue 13, pp 3085–3104

Human proximity and habitat fragmentation are key drivers of the rangewide bonobo distribution

  • Jena R. Hickey
  • Janet Nackoney
  • Nathan P. Nibbelink
  • Stephen Blake
  • Aime Bonyenge
  • Sally Coxe
  • Jef Dupain
  • Maurice Emetshu
  • Takeshi Furuichi
  • Falk Grossmann
  • Patrick Guislain
  • John Hart
  • Chie Hashimoto
  • Bernard Ikembelo
  • Omari Ilambu
  • Bila-Isia Inogwabini
  • Innocent Liengola
  • Albert Lotana Lokasola
  • Alain Lushimba
  • Fiona Maisels
  • Joel Masselink
  • Valentin Mbenzo
  • Norbert Mbangia Mulavwa
  • Pascal Naky
  • Nicolas Mwanza Ndunda
  • Pele Nkumu
  • Valentin Omasombo
  • Gay Edwards Reinartz
  • Robert Rose
  • Tetsuya Sakamaki
  • Samantha Strindberg
  • Hiroyuki Takemoto
  • Ashley Vosper
  • Hjalmar S. Kühl
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10531-013-0572-7

Cite this article as:
Hickey, J.R., Nackoney, J., Nibbelink, N.P. et al. Biodivers Conserv (2013) 22: 3085. doi:10.1007/s10531-013-0572-7

Abstract

Habitat loss and hunting threaten bonobos (Pan paniscus), Endangered (IUCN) great apes endemic to lowland rainforests of the Democratic Republic of Congo. Conservation planning requires a current, data-driven, rangewide map of probable bonobo distribution and an understanding of key attributes of areas used by bonobos. We present a rangewide suitability model for bonobos based on a maximum entropy algorithm in which data associated with locations of bonobo nests helped predict suitable conditions across the species’ entire range. We systematically evaluated available biotic and abiotic factors, including a bonobo-specific forest fragmentation layer (forest edge density), and produced a final model revealing the importance of simple threat-based factors in a data poor environment. We confronted the issue of survey bias in presence-only models and devised a novel evaluation approach applicable to other taxa by comparing models built with data from geographically distinct sub-regions that had higher survey effort. The model’s classification accuracy was high (AUC = 0.82). Distance from agriculture and forest edge density best predicted bonobo occurrence with bonobo nests more likely to occur farther from agriculture and in areas of lower edge density. These results suggest that bonobos either avoid areas of higher human activity, fragmented forests, or both, and that humans reduce the effective habitat of bonobos. The model results contribute to an increased understanding of threats to bonobo populations, as well as help identify priority areas for future surveys and determine core bonobo protection areas.

Keywords

BonoboDistributionFragmentationHabitatHuntingIUCN/SSC A.P.E.S. databasePan paniscus

Supplementary material

10531_2013_572_MOESM1_ESM.tif (1.3 mb)
Supplementary material 1The response curves of the relative suitability of conditions for bonobos and the predictor variables from the final rangewide MaxEnt model depict a negative relationship for forest fragmentation as measured by edge density (km/km2), and positive relationships for distance from river (km), distance from agriculture (km), and percent-forest landcover (TIFF 1300 kb)
10531_2013_572_MOESM2_ESM.tif (7.6 mb)
Supplementary material 2A comparison of the MaxEnt rangewide spatial predictions of relative suitability for bonobos (a) without elevation and (b) with elevation as a fifth variable, Democratic Republic of Congo (TIFF 7736 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jena R. Hickey
    • 1
  • Janet Nackoney
    • 2
  • Nathan P. Nibbelink
    • 3
  • Stephen Blake
    • 4
  • Aime Bonyenge
    • 5
  • Sally Coxe
    • 6
  • Jef Dupain
    • 7
  • Maurice Emetshu
    • 5
  • Takeshi Furuichi
    • 8
  • Falk Grossmann
    • 9
  • Patrick Guislain
    • 10
  • John Hart
    • 11
  • Chie Hashimoto
    • 8
  • Bernard Ikembelo
    • 5
  • Omari Ilambu
    • 12
  • Bila-Isia Inogwabini
    • 12
  • Innocent Liengola
    • 5
  • Albert Lotana Lokasola
    • 13
  • Alain Lushimba
    • 14
  • Fiona Maisels
    • 9
    • 15
  • Joel Masselink
    • 9
  • Valentin Mbenzo
    • 16
  • Norbert Mbangia Mulavwa
    • 17
  • Pascal Naky
    • 5
  • Nicolas Mwanza Ndunda
    • 17
  • Pele Nkumu
    • 5
  • Valentin Omasombo
    • 18
  • Gay Edwards Reinartz
    • 10
  • Robert Rose
    • 9
  • Tetsuya Sakamaki
    • 8
  • Samantha Strindberg
    • 9
  • Hiroyuki Takemoto
    • 8
  • Ashley Vosper
    • 19
  • Hjalmar S. Kühl
    • 20
  1. 1.Department of Natural ResourcesCornell UniversityIthacaUSA
  2. 2.Department of Geographical SciencesUniversity of MarylandCollege ParkUSA
  3. 3.Warnell School of Forestry and Natural ResourcesUniversity of GeorgiaAthensUSA
  4. 4.Max Planck Institute of OrnithologyRadolfzellGermany
  5. 5.Wildlife Conservation SocietyKinshasaDemocratic Republic of the Congo
  6. 6.Bonobo Conservation InitiativeWashingtonUSA
  7. 7.African Wildlife Foundation Conservation CentreNairobiKenya
  8. 8.Primate Research InstituteKyoto UniversityInuyamaJapan
  9. 9.Wildlife Conservation SocietyBronxUSA
  10. 10.Bonobo and Congo Biodiversity InitiativeZoological Society of MilwaukeeMilwaukeeUSA
  11. 11.Lukuru FoundationKinshasaDemocratic Republic of the Congo
  12. 12.World Wildlife Fund, DRCKinshasaDemocratic Republic of the Congo
  13. 13.Kokolopori Bonobo Nature ReserveKinshasaDemocratic Republic of the Congo
  14. 14.African Wildlife FoundationKinshasaDemocratic Republic of the Congo
  15. 15.School of Natural Sciences, Biological and Environmental SciencesUniversity of StirlingStirlingScotland, UK
  16. 16.Congo Basin Ecosystems Conservation Support Program (PACEBCo)KinshasaDemocratic Republic of the Congo
  17. 17.Center of Research in Ecology and Forestry (CREF)Ministry of Education and Scientific ResearchMabaliDemocratic Republic of the Congo
  18. 18.Congolese Institute for the Conservation of Nature (ICCN)KinshasaDemocratic Republic of the Congo
  19. 19.Wildlife Conservation SocietyZanagaDemocratic Republic of the Congo
  20. 20.Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary AnthropologyLeipzigGermany