Biological Invasions

, Volume 18, Issue 2, pp 345–353

Non-native and native organisms moving into high elevation and high latitude ecosystems in an era of climate change: new challenges for ecology and conservation

  • Aníbal Pauchard
  • Ann Milbau
  • Ann Albihn
  • Jake Alexander
  • Treena Burgess
  • Curtis Daehler
  • Göran Englund
  • Franz Essl
  • Birgitta Evengård
  • Gregory B. Greenwood
  • Sylvia Haider
  • Jonathan Lenoir
  • Keith McDougall
  • Erin Muths
  • Martin A. Nuñez
  • Johan Olofsson
  • Loic Pellissier
  • Wolfgang Rabitsch
  • Lisa J. Rew
  • Mark Robertson
  • Nathan Sanders
  • Christoph Kueffer
Invasion Note

DOI: 10.1007/s10530-015-1025-x

Cite this article as:
Pauchard, A., Milbau, A., Albihn, A. et al. Biol Invasions (2016) 18: 345. doi:10.1007/s10530-015-1025-x

Abstract

Cold environments at high elevation and high latitude are often viewed as resistant to biological invasions. However, climate warming, land use change and associated increased connectivity all increase the risk of biological invasions in these environments. Here we present a summary of the key discussions of the workshop ‘Biosecurity in Mountains and Northern Ecosystems: Current Status and Future Challenges’ (Flen, Sweden, 1–3 June 2015). The aims of the workshop were to (1) increase awareness about the growing importance of species expansion—both non-native and native—at high elevation and high latitude with climate change, (2) review existing knowledge about invasion risks in these areas, and (3) encourage more research on how species will move and interact in cold environments, the consequences for biodiversity, and animal and human health and wellbeing. The diversity of potential and actual invaders reported at the workshop and the likely interactions between them create major challenges for managers of cold environments. However, since these cold environments have experienced fewer invasions when compared with many warmer, more populated environments, prevention has a real chance of success, especially if it is coupled with prioritisation schemes for targeting invaders likely to have greatest impact. Communication and co-operation between cold environment regions will facilitate rapid response, and maximise the use of limited research and management resources.

Keywords

Alien species Arctic Exotic species Biosecurity Migration Range expansion Risk Sub-polar 

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Aníbal Pauchard
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ann Milbau
    • 3
    • 4
  • Ann Albihn
    • 5
    • 6
  • Jake Alexander
    • 7
  • Treena Burgess
    • 8
  • Curtis Daehler
    • 9
  • Göran Englund
    • 10
  • Franz Essl
    • 11
    • 12
  • Birgitta Evengård
    • 13
  • Gregory B. Greenwood
    • 14
  • Sylvia Haider
    • 15
    • 16
  • Jonathan Lenoir
    • 17
  • Keith McDougall
    • 18
  • Erin Muths
    • 19
  • Martin A. Nuñez
    • 20
  • Johan Olofsson
    • 10
  • Loic Pellissier
    • 21
    • 22
  • Wolfgang Rabitsch
    • 12
  • Lisa J. Rew
    • 23
  • Mark Robertson
    • 24
  • Nathan Sanders
    • 25
  • Christoph Kueffer
    • 7
    • 26
  1. 1.Facultad de Ciencias ForestalesUniversidad de ConcepciónConcepciónChile
  2. 2.Institute of Ecology and Biodiversity (IEB)SantiagoChile
  3. 3.Climate Impacts Research Centre (CIRC), Department of Ecology and Environmental ScienceUmeå UniversityUmeåSweden
  4. 4.Department of Biodiversity and Natural EnvironmentResearch Institute for Nature and ForestBrusselsBelgium
  5. 5.National Veterinary InstituteUppsalaSweden
  6. 6.Deparment of Biomedical Sciences and Veterinary Public HealthSwedish University of Agricultural SciencesUppsalaSweden
  7. 7.Department of Environmental Systems Science, Institute of Integrative BiologyETH ZurichZurichSwitzerland
  8. 8.Centre for Phytophthora Science and ManagementMurdoch UniversityPerthAustralia
  9. 9.Department of BotanyUniversity of HawaiiHonoluluUSA
  10. 10.Department of Ecology and Environmental ScienceUmeå UniversityUmeåSweden
  11. 11.Division of Conservation Biology, Vegetation and Landscape EcologyUniversity of ViennaViennaAustria
  12. 12.Environment Agency AustriaViennaAustria
  13. 13.Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Clinical MicrobiologyUmeå UniversityUmeåSweden
  14. 14.Mountain Research Initiative (MRI), Institute of GeographyUniversity of BernBernSwitzerland
  15. 15.Institute of Biology, Geobotany and Botanical GardenMartin Luther University Halle-WittenbergHalle (Saale)Germany
  16. 16.German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv)LeipzigGermany
  17. 17.UR “Ecologie et Dynamique des Systèmes Anthropisés” (EDYSAN, FRE 3498 CNRS-UPJV)Université de Picardie Jules VerneAmiensFrance
  18. 18.Department of Ecology, Environment and EvolutionLa Trobe UniversityWodongaAustralia
  19. 19.Fort Collins Science CenterU.S. Geological SurveyFort CollinsUSA
  20. 20.Grupo de Ecología de InvasionesUniversidad Nacional del Comahue, INIBIOMA, CONICETBarilocheArgentina
  21. 21.Landscape Ecology, Institute of Terrestrial EcosystemsETH ZurichZurichSwitzerland
  22. 22.Swiss Federal Research Institute WSLBirmensdorfSwitzerland
  23. 23.Department of Land Resources and Environmental SciencesMontana State UniversityBozemanUSA
  24. 24.Centre for Invasion Biology, Department of Zoology and EntomologyUniversity of PretoriaPretoriaSouth Africa
  25. 25.Center for Macroecology, Evolution and Climate, Natural History Museum of DenmarkUniversity of CopenhagenCopenhagenDenmark
  26. 26.Centre for Invasion Biology, Department of Botany and ZoologyStellenbosch UniversityMatielandSouth Africa