Biological Invasions

, Volume 16, Issue 4, pp 961–966

Potential impact of the Alien American Mink (Neovison vison) on Magellanic woodpeckers (Campephilus magellanicus) in Navarino Island, Southern Chile

  • Jaime E. Jiménez
  • Ramiro D. Crego
  • Gerardo E. Soto
  • Irán Román
  • Ricardo Rozzi
  • Pablo M. Vergara
Short Communication

DOI: 10.1007/s10530-013-0549-1

Cite this article as:
Jiménez, J.E., Crego, R.D., Soto, G.E. et al. Biol Invasions (2014) 16: 961. doi:10.1007/s10530-013-0549-1

Abstract

The American mink (Neovison vison) has been described as one of the worst invasive species in the northern hemisphere. Although some studies on the mink exist for the southern hemisphere, aside from impacts on marine and freshwater birds, its effect on other components of the biota is not well understood. Here, as a result of 3 different studies, we report evidence for the mink as a predator of the Magellanic woodpecker (Campephilus magellanicus). To our knowledge, these are the first evidences of predation on this charismatic and endemic woodpecker and indicate that mink might have a more widespread impact on forest birds than was initially suspected.

Keywords

American mink Campephilus Cape Horn Invasive Neovison Predation Subantarctic forests 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht (outside the USA) 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jaime E. Jiménez
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Ramiro D. Crego
    • 1
  • Gerardo E. Soto
    • 5
  • Irán Román
    • 1
  • Ricardo Rozzi
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Pablo M. Vergara
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of Biological SciencesUniversity of North TexasDentonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Philosophy and Religion StudiesUniversity of North TexasDentonUSA
  3. 3.Institute of Ecology and BiodiversitySantiagoChile
  4. 4.Universidad de MagallanesPunta ArenasChile
  5. 5.Universidad de SantiagoSantiagoChile