Biogerontology

, Volume 18, Issue 2, pp 253–262

Middle age enhances expression of innate immunity genes in a female mouse model of pulmonary fibrosis

  • Marcin Golec
  • Matthias Wielscher
  • Marta Kinga Lemieszek
  • Klemens Vierlinger
  • Czesława Skórska
  • Sophia Huetter
  • Jolanta Sitkowska
  • Barbara Mackiewicz
  • Anna Góra-Florek
  • Rolf Ziesche
  • Hagai Yanai
  • Vadim E. Fraifeld
  • Janusz Milanowski
  • Jacek Dutkiewicz
Research Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10522-017-9678-8

Cite this article as:
Golec, M., Wielscher, M., Lemieszek, M.K. et al. Biogerontology (2017) 18: 253. doi:10.1007/s10522-017-9678-8
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Abstract

The lungs are highly sensitive to tissue fibrosis, with a clear age-related component. Among the possible triggers of pulmonary fibrosis are repeated inhalations of fine organic particles. How age affects this response, is still far from being fully understood. We examined the impact of middle-age on gene expression in pulmonary fibrosis, using the novel “inhalation challenge set” mouse model. Our results demonstrate that the response of female mice to exposure of Pantoea agglomerans extract primarily involves various immune-related pathways and cell–cell/cell–extracellular matrix interactions. We found that middle-age had a strong effect on the response to the P. agglomerans-induced lung fibrosis, featured by a more rapid response and increased magnitude of expression changes. Genes belonging to innate immunity pathways (such as the TLR signaling and the NK-cell mediated cytotoxicity) were particularly up-regulated in middle-aged animals, suggesting that they may be potential targets for the treatment of pulmonary fibrosis caused by inhalations of organic particles. Our analysis also highlights the relevance of the “inhalation challenge set” mouse model to lung aging and related pathology.

Keywords

Aging Gene expression Pulmonary fibrosis Hypersensitivity pneumonitis Mice 

Supplementary material

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marcin Golec
    • 1
  • Matthias Wielscher
    • 2
  • Marta Kinga Lemieszek
    • 1
  • Klemens Vierlinger
    • 2
  • Czesława Skórska
    • 1
  • Sophia Huetter
    • 2
  • Jolanta Sitkowska
    • 1
  • Barbara Mackiewicz
    • 3
  • Anna Góra-Florek
    • 1
  • Rolf Ziesche
    • 4
  • Hagai Yanai
    • 5
  • Vadim E. Fraifeld
    • 5
  • Janusz Milanowski
    • 1
    • 3
  • Jacek Dutkiewicz
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Rural HealthLublinPoland
  2. 2.AIT - Austrian Institute of TechnologyViennaAustria
  3. 3.Department of Pneumonology, Oncology and AllergologyMedical University of LublinLublinPoland
  4. 4.Department of Internal Medicine II, Clinical Division of Pulmonary MedicineMedical University of ViennaViennaAustria
  5. 5.The Shraga Segal Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Genetics, Center for Multidisciplinary Research on AgingBen-Gurion University of the NegevBeer ShevaIsrael

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