Behavior Genetics

, Volume 43, Issue 2, pp 151–160

Competitive Ability in Male House Mice (Mus musculus): Genetic Influences

  • Christopher B. Cunningham
  • James S. Ruff
  • Kevin Chase
  • Wayne K. Potts
  • David R. Carrier
Original Research

DOI: 10.1007/s10519-012-9577-3

Cite this article as:
Cunningham, C.B., Ruff, J.S., Chase, K. et al. Behav Genet (2013) 43: 151. doi:10.1007/s10519-012-9577-3

Abstract

Conspecifics of many animal species physically compete to gain reproductive resources and thus fitness. Despite the importance of competitive ability across the animal kingdom, specific traits that influence or underpin competitive ability are poorly characterized. Here, we investigate whether there are genetic influences on competitive ability within male house mice. Additionally, we examined if litter demographics (litter size and litter sex ratio) influence competitive ability. We phenotyped two generations for a male’s ability to possess a reproductive resource––a prime nesting site––using semi-natural enclosures with mixed sex groupings. We used the “Animal Model” coupled with an extensive pedigree to estimate several genetic parameters. Competitive ability was found to be highly heritable, but only displayed a moderate genetic correlation to body mass. Interestingly, litter sex ratio had a weak negative influence on competitive ability. Litter size had no significant influence on competitive ability. Our study also highlights how much remains unknown about the proximal causes of competitive ability.

Keywords

Heritability Genetic correlation Life-history evolution Male–male competition Sexual selection 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher B. Cunningham
    • 1
    • 2
  • James S. Ruff
    • 1
  • Kevin Chase
    • 1
  • Wayne K. Potts
    • 1
  • David R. Carrier
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiologyUniversity of UtahSalt Lake CityUSA
  2. 2.Department of GeneticsUniversity of GeorgiaAthensUSA