American Journal of Community Psychology

, Volume 42, Issue 3, pp 220–234

Social Change Movements and the Struggle Over Meaning-Making: A Case Study of Domestic Violence Narratives

Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10464-008-9199-3

Cite this article as:
Lehrner, A. & Allen, N.E. Am J Community Psychol (2008) 42: 220. doi:10.1007/s10464-008-9199-3

Abstract

Social movement theorists have emphasized the important role of meaning-making for social change movements (e.g., D. A. Snow and R. D. Benford, 1992, In: A. D. Morris & C. M. Mueller (Eds.) Frontiers in social movement theory. Yale University Press, New Haven, CT, pp 133–155; C. M. Mueller, 1992, In: A. D. Morris & C. M. Mueller (Eds.) Frontiers in social movement theory. Yale University Press, New Haven, CT, pp 3–26). Using the domestic violence movement as a case study, this study undertakes a close analysis of advocates’ narratives about the phenomenon of domestic violence. This analysis sheds light on the current status of the movement as a social change movement attempting to promote alternative understandings of domestic violence as a social, rather than individual, problem. Study findings provide some evidence that the domestic violence movement has become increasingly de-politicized by documenting a range of narratives that convey an apolitical, degendered, individual-level analysis of domestic violence.

Keywords

Domestic violence movementSocial movementsSocial problemsBattered women

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-ChampaignChampaignUSA