AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 17, Issue 9, pp 2878–2892

Effectiveness of Structural-Level Needle/Syringe Programs to Reduce HCV and HIV Infection Among People Who Inject Drugs: A Systematic Review

Authors

    • Center for Global Health, Division of Global HIV/AIDS, Epidemiology and Strategic Information BranchCenters for Disease Control and Prevention
  • Jonathan Feelemyer
    • Chemical Dependency InstituteBeth Israel Medical Center
  • Shilpa Modi
    • Elliott School of International AffairsThe George Washington University
  • Ellen S. Stein
    • Global Health SciencesUniversity of California
  • Alya Briceno
    • Global Health SciencesUniversity of California
  • Salaam Semaan
    • Center for Global Health, Division of Global HIV/AIDS, Epidemiology and Strategic Information BranchCenters for Disease Control and Prevention
  • Tara Horvath
    • Global Health SciencesUniversity of California
  • Gail E. Kennedy
    • Global Health SciencesUniversity of California
  • Don C. Des Jarlais
    • Chemical Dependency InstituteBeth Israel Medical Center
Substantive Review

DOI: 10.1007/s10461-013-0593-y

Cite this article as:
Abdul-Quader, A.S., Feelemyer, J., Modi, S. et al. AIDS Behav (2013) 17: 2878. doi:10.1007/s10461-013-0593-y

Abstract

Needle-syringe programs (NSP) have been effective in reducing HIV and hepatitis C (HCV) infection among people who inject drugs (PWID). Achieving sustainable reductions in these blood-borne infections requires addressing structural factors so PWID can legally access NSP services. Systematic literature searches collected information on NSP coverage and changes in HIV or HCV infection prevalence or incidence at the population level. Included studies had to document biomarkers (HIV or HCV) coupled with structural-level NSP, defined by a minimum 50 % coverage of PWID and distribution of 10 or more needles/syringe per PWID per year. Fifteen studies reported structural-level NSP and changes in HIV or HCV infection prevalence/incidence. Nine reported decreases in HIV prevalence, six in HCV infection prevalence, and three reported decreases in HIV incidence. The results support NSP as a structural-level intervention to reduce population-level infection and implementation of NSP for prevention and treatment of HIV and HCV infection.

Keywords

Structural-level interventionsNeedle-exchange programsHIVHepatitis CPeople who inject drugs (PWID)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York (outside the USA) 2013