AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 15, Issue 7, pp 1397–1409

Once Daily Dosing Improves Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy

Authors

    • Division of Infectious DiseaseUniversity Health Network
    • Dalla Lana School of Public HealthUniversity of Toronto
  • Maggie Li
    • Division of Infectious DiseaseUniversity Health Network
  • Sharon Walmsley
    • Division of Infectious DiseaseUniversity Health Network
    • Departments of Medicine and Health PolicyManagement and Evaluation, University of Toronto
  • Curtis Cooper
    • The University of Ottawa, The Ottawa Hospital Division of Infectious Diseases
  • Sandra Blitz
    • Division of Infectious DiseaseUniversity Health Network
  • Ahmed M. Bayoumi
    • Departments of Medicine and Health PolicyManagement and Evaluation, University of Toronto
    • Centre for Research on Inner City Health, The Keenan Research Centre in the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute and Division of General Internal MedicineSt. Michael’s Hospital
  • Sean Rourke
    • Departments of Medicine and Health PolicyManagement and Evaluation, University of Toronto
    • Centre for Research on Inner City Health, The Keenan Research Centre in the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute and Division of General Internal MedicineSt. Michael’s Hospital
    • Ontario HIV Treatment Network
    • Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Toronto
  • Sergio Rueda
    • Centre for Research on Inner City Health, The Keenan Research Centre in the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute and Division of General Internal MedicineSt. Michael’s Hospital
    • Ontario HIV Treatment Network
  • Anita Rachlis
    • Departments of Medicine and Health PolicyManagement and Evaluation, University of Toronto
    • Division of Infectious DiseasesSunnybrook Health Sciences Centre
  • Nicole Mittmann
    • Health Outcomes and Pharmaco Economics (HOPE) Research CentreSunnybrook Health Sciences Centre
  • Marek Smieja
    • Department of Pathology and Molecular MedicineMcMaster University
  • Evan Collins
    • Division of Infectious DiseaseUniversity Health Network
    • Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Toronto
  • Mona R. Loutfy
    • Departments of Medicine and Health PolicyManagement and Evaluation, University of Toronto
    • Maple Leaf Medical Clinic
    • Women’s College Research InstituteWomen’s College Hospital
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10461-010-9818-5

Cite this article as:
Raboud, J., Li, M., Walmsley, S. et al. AIDS Behav (2011) 15: 1397. doi:10.1007/s10461-010-9818-5

Abstract

We studied the association of once-daily dosing with self-reported adherence among participants of the Ontario Cohort Study who were currently taking ART and who had completed a 90-min interviewer-administered questionnaire. Suboptimal adherence was defined as missing ≥1 dose of ART in the 4 days prior to the interview. Participants (n = 779) were 85% male, 69% men having sex with men, 67% white, median age 48 years (IQR 42–54), median years of ART 9 (IQR 5–13) and median CD4 count 463 cells/mm3 (IQR 320–638). Fifteen percent of participants reported suboptimal adherence in the 4 days prior to the interview. In a multivariable logistic regression model, participants on once daily regimens were half as likely to miss a dose during the 4 days prior to the interview. Other independent correlates of suboptimal adherence were younger age, lower positive social interaction and increased frequency of consuming > 6 alcoholic drinks on one occasion.

Keywords

Adherence HIV Antiretroviral therapy Once-daily dosing

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010