Original Paper

AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 15, Issue 7, pp 1397-1409

Once Daily Dosing Improves Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy

  • Janet RaboudAffiliated withDivision of Infectious Disease, University Health NetworkDalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto Email author 
  • , Maggie LiAffiliated withDivision of Infectious Disease, University Health Network
  • , Sharon WalmsleyAffiliated withDivision of Infectious Disease, University Health NetworkDepartments of Medicine and Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto
  • , Curtis CooperAffiliated withThe University of Ottawa, The Ottawa Hospital Division of Infectious Diseases
  • , Sandra BlitzAffiliated withDivision of Infectious Disease, University Health Network
  • , Ahmed M. BayoumiAffiliated withDepartments of Medicine and Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of TorontoCentre for Research on Inner City Health, The Keenan Research Centre in the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute and Division of General Internal Medicine, St. Michael’s Hospital
  • , Sean RourkeAffiliated withDepartments of Medicine and Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of TorontoCentre for Research on Inner City Health, The Keenan Research Centre in the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute and Division of General Internal Medicine, St. Michael’s HospitalOntario HIV Treatment NetworkDepartment of Psychiatry, University of Toronto
  • , Sergio RuedaAffiliated withCentre for Research on Inner City Health, The Keenan Research Centre in the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute and Division of General Internal Medicine, St. Michael’s HospitalOntario HIV Treatment Network
  • , Anita RachlisAffiliated withDepartments of Medicine and Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of TorontoDivision of Infectious Diseases, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre
    • , Nicole MittmannAffiliated withHealth Outcomes and Pharmaco Economics (HOPE) Research Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre
    • , Marek SmiejaAffiliated withDivision of Infectious Disease, University Health NetworkDepartment of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University
    • , Evan CollinsAffiliated withDivision of Infectious Disease, University Health NetworkDepartment of Psychiatry, University of Toronto
    • , Mona R. LoutfyAffiliated withDivision of Infectious Disease, University Health NetworkDepartments of Medicine and Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of TorontoMaple Leaf Medical ClinicWomen’s College Research Institute, Women’s College Hospital

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Abstract

We studied the association of once-daily dosing with self-reported adherence among participants of the Ontario Cohort Study who were currently taking ART and who had completed a 90-min interviewer-administered questionnaire. Suboptimal adherence was defined as missing ≥1 dose of ART in the 4 days prior to the interview. Participants (n = 779) were 85% male, 69% men having sex with men, 67% white, median age 48 years (IQR 42–54), median years of ART 9 (IQR 5–13) and median CD4 count 463 cells/mm3 (IQR 320–638). Fifteen percent of participants reported suboptimal adherence in the 4 days prior to the interview. In a multivariable logistic regression model, participants on once daily regimens were half as likely to miss a dose during the 4 days prior to the interview. Other independent correlates of suboptimal adherence were younger age, lower positive social interaction and increased frequency of consuming > 6 alcoholic drinks on one occasion.

Keywords

Adherence HIV Antiretroviral therapy Once-daily dosing