Report

AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 14, Issue 5, pp 1198-1202

Acceptability of Infant Male Circumcision as Part of HIV Prevention and Male Reproductive Health Efforts in Gaborone, Botswana, and Surrounding Areas

  • Rebeca M. PlankAffiliated withDivision of Infectious Diseases, Brigham and Women’s HospitalBotswana-Harvard School of Public Health AIDS Initiative for HIV Research and EducationDepartment of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Harvard School of Public Health Email author 
  • , Joseph MakhemaAffiliated withBotswana-Harvard School of Public Health AIDS Initiative for HIV Research and Education
  • , Poloko KebaabetsweAffiliated withCenters for Disease Control and Prevention Botswana, USA (BOTUSA)
  • , Fatima HusseinAffiliated withBotswana National Ministry of Health
  • , Chiapo LesetediAffiliated withBotswana National Ministry of HealthPrincess Marina Hospital Department of Surgery
  • , Daniel HalperinAffiliated withDepartment of Global Health and Population, Harvard School of Public Health
  • , Barbara BassilAffiliated with
  • , Roger ShapiroAffiliated withBotswana-Harvard School of Public Health AIDS Initiative for HIV Research and EducationDepartment of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Harvard School of Public HealthDivision of Infectious Diseases, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
  • , Shahin LockmanAffiliated withDivision of Infectious Diseases, Brigham and Women’s HospitalBotswana-Harvard School of Public Health AIDS Initiative for HIV Research and EducationDepartment of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Harvard School of Public Health

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Abstract

Adult male circumcision reduces a man’s risk for heterosexual HIV acquisition. Infant circumcision is safer, easier and less costly but not widespread in southern Africa. Questionnaires were administered to sixty mothers of newborn boys in Botswana: 92% responded they would circumcise if the procedure were available in a clinical setting, primarily to prevent future HIV infection, and 85% stated the infant’s father must participate in the decision. Neonatal male circumcision appears to be acceptable in Botswana and deserves urgent attention in resource-limited regions with high HIV prevalence, with the aim to expand services in safe, culturally acceptable and sustainable ways.

Keywords

Neonatal Infant Male circumcision Acceptability Botswana HIV Prevention