International Journal for the Advancement of Counselling

, Volume 35, Issue 3, pp 203–215

Own Group Oppression, Other Group Oppression, and Perspective Taking

  • Eunju Yoon
  • Jennifer Moulton
  • Gihane Jeremie-Brink
  • Meghan Hansen
ORIGINAL ARTICLE

DOI: 10.1007/s10447-012-9177-1

Cite this article as:
Yoon, E., Moulton, J., Jeremie-Brink, G. et al. Int J Adv Counselling (2013) 35: 203. doi:10.1007/s10447-012-9177-1

Abstract

This survey research examined the relationship of awareness of own versus awareness of other group oppression across sexism, racism, and homonegativity, by including perspective taking (PT) as a moderator. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses indicated that awareness of sexism (own group oppression) predicted awareness of racism (other group oppression) in a sample of 116 European American females (Study 1), whereas awareness of racism (own group oppression) did not predict awareness of homonegativity (other group oppression) in a sample of 113 U.S. racial minorities (Study 2). High PT, compared to low PT, did not predict a stronger relationship between awareness of own and awareness of other group oppression. Post-hoc speculation on the role of PT in intergroup relations and implications for research and counseling are discussed.

Keywords

OppressionIntergroup relationPerspective taking

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eunju Yoon
    • 1
  • Jennifer Moulton
    • 1
  • Gihane Jeremie-Brink
    • 1
  • Meghan Hansen
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Counseling Psychology ProgramLoyola University ChicagoChicagoUSA
  2. 2.Clinical Psychology ProgramIllinois Institute of TechnologyChicagoUSA