Annals of Biomedical Engineering

, Volume 43, Issue 3, pp 616–627

Macrophages Modulate Engineered Human Tissues for Enhanced Vascularization and Healing

  • Kara L. Spiller
  • Donald O. Freytes
  • Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10439-014-1156-8

Cite this article as:
Spiller, K.L., Freytes, D.O. & Vunjak-Novakovic, G. Ann Biomed Eng (2015) 43: 616. doi:10.1007/s10439-014-1156-8

Abstract

Tissue engineering is increasingly based on recapitulating human physiology, through integration of biological principles into engineering designs. In spite of all progress in engineering functional human tissues, we are just beginning to develop effective methods for establishing blood perfusion and controlling the inflammatory factors following implantation into the host. Functional vasculature largely determines tissue survival and function in vivo. The inflammatory response is a major regulator of vascularization and overall functionality of engineered tissues, through the activity of different types of macrophages and the cytokines they secrete. We discuss here the cell–scaffold–bioreactor systems for harnessing the inflammatory response for enhanced tissue vascularization and healing. To this end, inert scaffolds that have been considered for many decades a “gold standard” in regenerative medicine are beginning to be replaced by a new generation of “smart” tissue engineering systems designed to actively mediate tissue survival and function.

Keywords

Scaffold Vascularization Inflammatory response Tissue engineering Healing 

Abbreviations

M0

Mature and non-polarized macrophages

M1

Macrophages polarized to the inflammatory phenotype, either by in vitro stimulation or in the in vivo environment

M2

Macrophages polarized to the anti-inflammatory phenotype, either by in vitro stimulation or in the in vivo environment

M2a

Macrophages polarized through the addition of IL-4

M2c

Macrophages polarized through the addition of IL-10

PBMCs

Peripheral blood mononuclear cells

MSCs

Mesenchymal stem cells

IL

Interleukin

TNF-α

Tumor necrosis factor-alpha

TLRs

Toll-like receptors

VEGF

Vascular endothelial growth factor

bFGF

Basic fibroblast growth factor

PDGF-BB

Platelet-derived growth factor-BB

MMP9

Matrix metalloprotease-9

MCP-1

Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1

IFN-γ

Interferon-gamma

S1P

Sphingosine-1-phosphate

ECM

Extracellular matrix

TGF-β

Transforming growth factor-β

SDF-1

Stromal-derived factor 1

Copyright information

© Biomedical Engineering Society 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kara L. Spiller
    • 1
  • Donald O. Freytes
    • 2
  • Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic
    • 3
  1. 1.Drexel UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.New York Stem Cell Foundation Research InstituteNew YorkUSA
  3. 3.Mikati Foundation Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Medical SciencesColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA

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