Journal of Pest Science

, Volume 88, Issue 3, pp 469–494

Invasion biology of spotted wing Drosophila (Drosophila suzukii): a global perspective and future priorities

  • Mark K. Asplen
  • Gianfranco Anfora
  • Antonio Biondi
  • Deuk-Soo Choi
  • Dong Chu
  • Kent M. Daane
  • Patricia Gibert
  • Andrew P. Gutierrez
  • Kim A. Hoelmer
  • William D. Hutchison
  • Rufus Isaacs
  • Zhi-Lin Jiang
  • Zsolt Kárpáti
  • Masahito T. Kimura
  • Marta Pascual
  • Christopher R. Philips
  • Christophe Plantamp
  • Luigi Ponti
  • Gábor Vétek
  • Heidrun Vogt
  • Vaughn M. Walton
  • Yi Yu
  • Lucia Zappalà
  • Nicolas Desneux
Review

DOI: 10.1007/s10340-015-0681-z

Cite this article as:
Asplen, M.K., Anfora, G., Biondi, A. et al. J Pest Sci (2015) 88: 469. doi:10.1007/s10340-015-0681-z

Abstract

The Asian vinegar fly Drosophila suzukii (spotted wing Drosophila [SWD]) has emerged as a major invasive insect pest of small and stone fruits in both the Americas and Europe since the late 2000s. While research efforts have rapidly progressed in Asia, North America, and Europe over the past 5 years, important new insights may be gained in comparing and contrasting findings across the regions affected by SWD. In this review, we explore common themes in the invasion biology of SWD by examining (1) its biology and current pest status in endemic and recently invaded regions; (2) current efforts and future research needs for the development of predictive models for its geographic expansion; and (3) prospects for both natural and classical (=importation) biological control of SWD in invaded habitats, with emphasis on the role of hymenopteran parasitoids. We conclude that particularly fruitful areas of research should include fundamental studies of its overwintering, host-use, and dispersal capabilities; as well as applied studies of alternative, cost-effective management techniques to complement insecticide use within the integrated pest management framework. Finally, we emphasize that outreach efforts are critical to effective SWD management by highlighting successful strategies and insights gained from various geographic regions.

Keywords

Biological control Drosophila Frugivore Integrated pest management Invasion biology 

Supplementary material

10340_2015_681_MOESM1_ESM.docx (1.2 mb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 1254 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mark K. Asplen
    • 1
  • Gianfranco Anfora
    • 2
  • Antonio Biondi
    • 3
    • 4
  • Deuk-Soo Choi
    • 5
  • Dong Chu
    • 6
  • Kent M. Daane
    • 3
  • Patricia Gibert
    • 7
  • Andrew P. Gutierrez
    • 3
    • 8
  • Kim A. Hoelmer
    • 9
  • William D. Hutchison
    • 10
  • Rufus Isaacs
    • 11
  • Zhi-Lin Jiang
    • 12
  • Zsolt Kárpáti
    • 13
  • Masahito T. Kimura
    • 14
  • Marta Pascual
    • 15
  • Christopher R. Philips
    • 10
    • 16
  • Christophe Plantamp
    • 7
  • Luigi Ponti
    • 8
    • 17
  • Gábor Vétek
    • 18
  • Heidrun Vogt
    • 19
  • Vaughn M. Walton
    • 20
  • Yi Yu
    • 21
  • Lucia Zappalà
    • 4
  • Nicolas Desneux
    • 22
  1. 1.Natural Sciences DepartmentMetropolitan State UniversitySaint PaulUSA
  2. 2.Research and Innovation CentreFondazione Edmund, MachSan Michele all’adigeItaly
  3. 3.Department of Environmental Science, Policy, & ManagementUniversity of California BerkeleyBerkeleyUSA
  4. 4.Department of Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentUniversity of CataniaCataniaItaly
  5. 5.Experiment & Analysis Division, Yeongnam Regional OfficeAnimal and Plant Quarantine AgencyBusanSouth Korea
  6. 6.Key Laboratory of Integrated Crop Pest Management of Shandong Province, College of Agronomy and Plant ProtectionQingdao Agricultural UniversityQingdaoChina
  7. 7.Laboratoire de Biométrie et Biologie Evolutive, UMR CNRS 5558Université de LyonVilleurbanne CedexFrance
  8. 8.Center for the Analysis of Sustainable Agricultural SystemsKensingtonUSA
  9. 9.USDA ARS Beneficial Insects Introduction Research UnitNewarkUSA
  10. 10.Department of EntomologyUniversity of MinnesotaSaint PaulUSA
  11. 11.Department of Entomology, 202 Center for Integrated Plant SystemsMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA
  12. 12.Key Laboratory for Agricultural Biodiversity and Pest Management of the Ministry of Education of China, College of Plant ProtectionYunnan Agricultural UniversityKunmingChina
  13. 13.Department of Zoology, Centre for Agricultural Research; Plant Protection InstituteHungarian Academy of SciencesBudapestHungary
  14. 14.Graduate School of Environmental Earth ScienceHokkaido UniversitySapporoJapan
  15. 15.Department of Genetics and IrBio, BiologyUniversitat de BarcelonaBarcelonaSpain
  16. 16.Department of Entomology, NC Research & Outreach CenterUniversity of MinnesotaGrand RapidsUSA
  17. 17.Agenzia nazionale per le nuove tecnologie, l’energia e lo sviluppo economico sostenibile (ENEA), Centro Ricerche CasacciaRomeItaly
  18. 18.Department of Entomology, Faculty of Horticultural ScienceCorvinus University of BudapestBudapestHungary
  19. 19.Julius Kühn-Institut (JKI)-Federal Research Centre for Cultivated PlantsInstitute for Plant Protection in Fruit Crops and ViticultureDossenheimGermany
  20. 20.Department of Horticulture; Oregon Wine Research InstituteOregon State UniversityCorvallisUSA
  21. 21.Key Laboratory for Plant Virology of Shandong, Institute of Plant ProtectionShandong Academy of Agricultural SciencesJinanChina
  22. 22.UMR 1355-7254 Institut Sophia AgrobiotechFrench National Institute for Agricultural Research (INRA), Univ. Nice Sophia Antipolis, CNRSSophia AntipolisFrance