Cognitive Processing

, Volume 11, Issue 1, pp 21–30

A self-referential default brain state: patterns of coherence, power, and eLORETA sources during eyes-closed rest and Transcendental Meditation practice

  • Fred Travis
  • David A. F. Haaga
  • John Hagelin
  • Melissa Tanner
  • Alaric Arenander
  • Sanford Nidich
  • Carolyn Gaylord-King
  • Sarina Grosswald
  • Maxwell Rainforth
  • Robert H. Schneider
Research Report

DOI: 10.1007/s10339-009-0343-2

Cite this article as:
Travis, F., Haaga, D.A.F., Hagelin, J. et al. Cogn Process (2010) 11: 21. doi:10.1007/s10339-009-0343-2

Abstract

Activation of a default mode network (DMN) including frontal and parietal midline structures varies with cognitive load, being more active during low-load tasks and less active during high-load tasks requiring executive control. Meditation practices entail various degrees of cognitive control. Thus, DMN activation patterns could give insight into the nature of meditation practices. This 10-week random assignment study compared theta2, alpha1, alpha2, beta1, beta2 and gamma EEG coherence, power, and eLORETA cortical sources during eyes-closed rest and Transcendental Meditation (TM) practice in 38 male and female college students, average age 23.7 years. Significant brainwave differences were seen between groups. Compared to eyes-closed rest, TM practice led to higher alpha1 frontal log-power, and lower beta1 and gamma frontal and parietal log-power; higher frontal and parietal alpha1 interhemispheric coherence and higher frontal and frontal-central beta2 intrahemispheric coherence. eLORETA analysis identified sources of alpha1 activity in midline cortical regions that overlapped with the DMN. Greater activation in areas that overlap the DMN during TM practice suggests that meditation practice may lead to a foundational or ‘ground’ state of cerebral functioning that may underlie eyes-closed rest and more focused cognitive processes.

Keywords

CoherencePowerLORETATranscendental MeditationAlphaBeta1

Copyright information

© Marta Olivetti Belardinelli and Springer-Verlag 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fred Travis
    • 1
  • David A. F. Haaga
    • 2
  • John Hagelin
    • 3
  • Melissa Tanner
    • 2
  • Alaric Arenander
    • 3
    • 4
  • Sanford Nidich
    • 5
  • Carolyn Gaylord-King
    • 5
  • Sarina Grosswald
    • 3
  • Maxwell Rainforth
    • 5
  • Robert H. Schneider
    • 5
  1. 1.Center for Brain, Consciousness and CognitionMaharishi University of ManagementFairfieldUSA
  2. 2.Psychology DepartmentAmerican UniversityWashingtonUSA
  3. 3.Institute of Science, Technology and Public PolicyFairfieldUSA
  4. 4.Brain Research InstituteMaharishi University of Management Research InstituteMaharishi Vedic CityUSA
  5. 5.Institute for Natural Medicine and PreventionMaharishi University of Management Research InstituteMaharishi Vedic CityUSA