Animal Cognition

, Volume 13, Issue 5, pp 753–764

Reinforcement as a mediator of the perception of humans by horses (Equus caballus)

  • Carol Sankey
  • Marie-Annick Richard-Yris
  • Séverine Henry
  • Carole Fureix
  • Fouad Nassur
  • Martine Hausberger
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10071-010-0326-9

Cite this article as:
Sankey, C., Richard-Yris, MA., Henry, S. et al. Anim Cogn (2010) 13: 753. doi:10.1007/s10071-010-0326-9

Abstract

A central question in the interspecific human/animal relationship is how domestic animals perceive humans as a significant element of their environment. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the use of positive or negative reinforcement in horse training may have consequences on the animals’ perception of humans, as a positive, negative or neutral element. Two groups of ponies were trained to walk backwards in response to a vocal order using either positive or negative reinforcement. Heart rate monitors and behavioural observations were used to assess the animals’ perception of humans on the short (just after training) and long (5 months later) terms. The results showed that the type of reinforcement had a major effect on the subsequent animals’ perception of familiar and unfamiliar humans. Negative reinforcement was rapidly associated with an increased emotional state, as revealed by heart rate measurements and behavioural observations (head movements and ears laid back position). Its use led the ponies to seek less contact with humans. On the contrary, ponies trained with positive reinforcement showed an increased interest in humans and sought contact after training. This is especially remarkable as it was reached in a maximum of 5 sessions of 1 to 3 min (i.e. 5 to 15 min) and had lasting effects (visible after 5 months). Even learning was positively influenced by positive reinforcement. Overall, horses seem capable of associating humans to particular experiences and display extended long-term memory abilities.

Keywords

Perception of humans Human/animal relationship Positive reinforcement Negative reinforcement Equus caballus 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carol Sankey
    • 1
  • Marie-Annick Richard-Yris
    • 2
  • Séverine Henry
    • 1
  • Carole Fureix
    • 1
    • 2
  • Fouad Nassur
    • 2
  • Martine Hausberger
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratoire d’éthologie animale et humaine, UMR 6552 CNRSUniversité de Rennes 1PaimpontFrance
  2. 2.Laboratoire d’éthologie animale et humaine—UMR 6552Université de Rennes 1/CNRSRennes CedexFrance

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