Food Science and Biotechnology

, Volume 23, Issue 1, pp 261–267

Turmeric (Curcuma longa) whole powder reduces accumulation of visceral fat mass and increases hepatic oxidative stress in rats fed a high-fat diet

Authors

  • Chi-Ho Lee
    • Department of Food Science and Biotechnology of Animal ResourcesKonkuk University
  • Ah-Young Kim
    • Department of Food Science and Biotechnology of Animal ResourcesKonkuk University
  • Chang-Won Pyun
    • Department of Food Science and Biotechnology of Animal ResourcesKonkuk University
  • Michihiro Fukushima
    • Department of Food ScienceObihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine
    • Department of Food ScienceObihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine
Research Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10068-014-0036-1

Cite this article as:
Lee, C., Kim, A., Pyun, C. et al. Food Sci Biotechnol (2014) 23: 261. doi:10.1007/s10068-014-0036-1

Abstract

Turmeric powder (TP) containing approximately 5.15% curcumin was evaluated for reduction of development of high-fat diet-induced obesity. Rats were fed a 30% fat diet containing 5, 10, and 20 g of TP/100 g of diet (TP-5, TP-10, and TP-20 groups) for 30 days. Body weight gain, energy intake, and the visceral fat mass for the TP-10 and TP-20 groups were lower than for the control group. Serum triglyceride and hepatic total lipid levels for the TP-10 and TP-20 groups were lower than for the control group. The hepatic glutathione concentration and the glutathione-S-transferase activity for all TP groups, and the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances level for the TP-20 group, were higher than for the control group. A high dose of turmeric powder apparently reduces development of high-fat diet-induced obesity, but also causes the adverse effect of increasing oxidative stress in rats.

Keywords

curcumin food intake high-fat diet obesity turmeric

Copyright information

© The Korean Society of Food Science and Technology and Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014