Journal of Bone and Mineral Metabolism

, Volume 31, Issue 6, pp 637–643

Effects of total bilirubin on the prevalence of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women without potential liver disease

Authors

  • Lu-Qin Bian
    • Department of Pneumoconiosis, Shanghai Pulmonary HospitalTongji University School of Medicine
  • Rong-Zhen Li
    • Department of Orthopaedic SurgeryNingbo No. 9 Hospital
    • Joint Center, Department of Orthopaedic SurgerySeoul Now Hospital
    • Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Samsung Medical CenterSungkyunkwan University School of Medicine
  • Zheng-Yun Zhang
    • Department of Surgery, Shanghai First People’s HospitalShanghai Jiaotong University
    • Transplantation Research Center, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Samsung Medical CenterSungkyunkwan University School of Medicine
  • Yan-Ji Jin
    • Department of NursingSeoul Now Hospital
  • Hyung-Wook Kang
    • Joint Center, Department of Orthopaedic SurgerySeoul Now Hospital
  • Zhen-Zhu Fang
    • Department of Orthopaedic SurgeryNingbo No. 9 Hospital
  • Youn-Soo Park
    • Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Samsung Medical CenterSungkyunkwan University School of Medicine
    • Center for Health Promotion, Samsung Medical CenterSungkyunkwan University School of Medicine
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00774-013-0452-y

Cite this article as:
Bian, L., Li, R., Zhang, Z. et al. J Bone Miner Metab (2013) 31: 637. doi:10.1007/s00774-013-0452-y

Abstract

It is still uncertain whether total bilirubin per se is a risk factor for osteoporosis in postmenopausal women and no study has so far examined this important issue. This study was designed to assess the sheer effects of total bilirubin on the prevalence of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women without potential liver disease. In the present study, postmenopausal female subjects without potential liver disease (n = 918) who underwent measurement of bone mineral density were enrolled. Correlation and logistic regression analysis were used to assess the relationship between total bilirubin and other variables. As a result, subjects with osteoporosis had a significantly lower total bilirubin level (P = 0.005). A 0.1 mg/dl increase in total bilirubin was associated with reduced odds ratio of the risk by 38 % for osteoporosis [OR 0.62 (95 % CI 0.52–0.88), P = 0.012] after adjustment for several variables. Total bilirubin was independently associated with BMD [coefficient = 0.41, 95 % CI (0.35–0.47), P < 0.001 for lumbar spine and coefficient = 0.44, 95 % CI (0.36–0.48), P < 0.001 for femur neck]. A positive correlation could be observed with significant difference between total bilirubin and z-score (r = 0.33, P < 0.001 for lumbar spine and r = 0.37, P < 0.001 for femur neck) and total bilirubin was positively correlated with serum calcium (r = 0.13, P < 0.001) as well. Therefore, this study demonstrates an independent inverse association between total bilirubin and the prevalence of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women without potential liver disease. Total bilirubin would be useful as a provisional new risk factor of osteoporosis in such a population.

Keywords

Osteoporosis Total bilirubin Bone mineral density t-score z-score

Copyright information

© The Japanese Society for Bone and Mineral Research and Springer Japan 2013