Journal of Anesthesia

, Volume 30, Issue 3, pp 530–533

Feasibility of eye-tracking technology to quantify expertise in ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia

  • T. Kyle Harrison
  • T. Edward Kim
  • Alex Kou
  • Cynthia Shum
  • Edward R. Mariano
  • Steven K. Howard
  • The ADAPT (Anesthesiology-Directed Advanced Procedural Training) Research Group
Short Communication

DOI: 10.1007/s00540-016-2157-6

Cite this article as:
Harrison, T., Kim, T., Kou, A. et al. J Anesth (2016) 30: 530. doi:10.1007/s00540-016-2157-6

Abstract

Ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia (UGRA) requires an advanced procedural skill set that incorporates both sonographic knowledge of relevant anatomy as well as technical proficiency in needle manipulation in order to achieve a successful outcome. Understanding how to differentiate a novice from an expert in UGRA using a quantifiable tool may be useful for comparing educational interventions that could improve the rate at which one develops expertise. Exploring the gaze pattern of individuals performing a task has been used to evaluate expertise in many different disciplines, including medicine. However, the use of eye-tracking technology has not been previously applied to UGRA. The purpose of this preliminary study is to establish the feasibility of applying such technology as a measurement tool for comparing procedural expertise in UGRA. eye-tracking data were collected from one expert and one novice utilizing Tobii Glasses 2 while performing a simulated ultrasound-guided thoracic paravertebral block in a gel phantom model. Area of interest fixations were recorded and heat maps of gaze fixations were created. Results suggest a potential application of eye-tracking technology in the assessment of UGRA learning and performance.

Keywords

Regional anesthesiaEye trackingVisual attentionEducationSimulationUltrasound

Copyright information

© Japanese Society of Anesthesiologists (outside the USA) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Kyle Harrison
    • 1
    • 2
  • T. Edward Kim
    • 1
    • 2
  • Alex Kou
    • 1
    • 2
  • Cynthia Shum
    • 1
  • Edward R. Mariano
    • 1
    • 2
  • Steven K. Howard
    • 1
    • 2
  • The ADAPT (Anesthesiology-Directed Advanced Procedural Training) Research Group
  1. 1.Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain MedicineStanford University School of MedicineStanfordUSA
  2. 2.Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care ServiceVeterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care SystemPalo AltoUSA