Cognitive remediation in pediatric chronic kidney disease and end-stage kidney disease: rationale, candidate interventions, and applicability

  • Karina Javalkar
  • Maria E. Ferris
  • Jessica Cuttance
  • Stephen R. Hooper
Educational Review

DOI: 10.1007/s00467-017-3617-4

Cite this article as:
Javalkar, K., Ferris, M.E., Cuttance, J. et al. Pediatr Nephrol (2017). doi:10.1007/s00467-017-3617-4

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to address the potential use of cognitive remediation interventions for children and adolescents with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). The prevalence and risk for neurocognitive dysfunction in children with this condition remains high, but, to date, interventions targeting these challenges have not been attempted either individually or as part of a larger treatment program. This is the next logical step in addressing the neurocognitive dysfunction that can be present in pediatric CKD/ESKD, with the field needing to determine the efficacy of cognitive remediation approaches for this population. To our knowledge, this paper is the first to raise this possibility by identifying candidate treatments addressing the neurocognitive challenges observed in children and adolescents with CKD/ESKD. Initially, we present the rationale for the importance of addressing the cognitive difficulties in this population, including an overview of the literature documenting the neurocognitive deficits associated with pediatric-onset CKD/ESKD. This is followed by a review of five candidate cognitive remediation programs that may be applicable to patients with this condition, and associated factors that could affect such treatment. The paper concludes with suggestions for both clinical and research initiatives that could be implemented to examine cognitive remediation as potential components of a larger treatment program for children and adolescents with CKD/ESKD.

Keywords

CKD Cognition Cognitive dysfunction Pediatric-onset CKD Cognitive remediation Cognitive rehabilitation 

Copyright information

© IPNA 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karina Javalkar
    • 1
  • Maria E. Ferris
    • 1
  • Jessica Cuttance
    • 1
  • Stephen R. Hooper
    • 1
  1. 1.School of MedicineUniversity of North Carolina-Chapel HillChapel HillUSA

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