Dysphagia

, Volume 26, Issue 1, pp 49–61

Omission of Dysphagia Therapies in Hospital Discharge Communications

Authors

    • Geriatrics Section, Department of MedicineUniversity of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health
    • Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center (GRECC)William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital, United States Department of Veterans Affairs
    • Department of Population Health SciencesUniversity of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health
  • Paul Anderson
    • Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center (GRECC)William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital, United States Department of Veterans Affairs
    • University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health
  • Jacqueline Hind
    • Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center (GRECC)William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital, United States Department of Veterans Affairs
    • Gastroenterology and Hepatology Section, Department of MedicineUniversity of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health
  • JoAnne Robbins
    • Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center (GRECC)William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital, United States Department of Veterans Affairs
    • Gastroenterology and Hepatology Section, Department of MedicineUniversity of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health
  • Maureen Smith
    • Department of Population Health SciencesUniversity of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health
    • Department of Family MedicineUniversity of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00455-009-9266-4

Cite this article as:
Kind, A., Anderson, P., Hind, J. et al. Dysphagia (2011) 26: 49. doi:10.1007/s00455-009-9266-4

Abstract

Despite the wide implementation of dysphagia therapies, it is unclear whether these therapies are successfully communicated beyond the inpatient setting. The aim of this study was to examine the rate of dysphagia recommendation omissions in hospital discharge summaries for high-risk subacute care (i.e., skilled nursing facility, rehabilitation, long-term care) populations. We performed a retrospective cohort study that included all stroke and hip fracture patients billed for inpatient dysphagia evaluations by speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and discharged to subacute care from 2003 through 2005 from a single large academic medical center (N = 187). Dysphagia recommendations from final SLP hospital notes and from hospital (physician) discharge summaries were abstracted, coded, and compared for each patient. Recommendation categories included dietary (food and liquid), postural/compensatory techniques (e.g., chin tuck), rehabilitation (e.g., exercise), meal pacing (e.g., small bites), medication delivery (e.g., crush pills), and provider/supervision (e.g., 1-to-1 assist). Forty-five percent of discharge summaries omitted all SLP dysphagia recommendations. Forty-seven percent (88/186) of patients with SLP dietary recommendations, 82% (93/114) with postural, 100% (16/16) with rehabilitation, 90% (69/77) with meal pacing, 95% (21/22) with medication, and 79% (96/122) with provider/supervision recommendations had these recommendations completely omitted from their discharge summaries. Discharge summaries omitted all categories of SLP recommendations at notably high rates. Improved post-hospital communication strategies are needed for discharges to subacute care.

Keywords

Care management Communication Continuity of care Hospital discharge Deglutition Deglutition disorders

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010