Human Genetics

, Volume 107, Issue 6, pp 582–590

Y chromosome haplotypes reveal prehistorical migrations to the Himalayas

  • Bing Su
  • Chunjie Xiao
  • Ranjan Deka
  • Mark T. Seielstad
  • Daoroong Kangwanpong
  • Junhua Xiao
  • Daru Lu
  • Peter Underhill
  • Luca Cavalli-Sforza
  • Ranajit Chakraborty
  • Li Jin
Original Investigations

DOI: 10.1007/s004390000406

Cite this article as:
Su, B., Xiao, C., Deka, R. et al. Hum Genet (2000) 107: 582. doi:10.1007/s004390000406

Abstract

By using 19 Y chromosome biallelic markers and 3 Y chromosome microsatellite markers, we analyzed the genetic structure of 31 indigenous Sino-Tibetan speaking populations (607 individuals) currently residing in East, Southeast, and South Asia. Our results showed that a T to C mutation at locus M122 is highly prevalent in almost all of the Sino-Tibetan populations, implying a strong genetic affinity among populations in the same language family. Furthermore, the extremely high frequency of H8, a haplotype derived from M122C, in the Sino-Tibetan speaking populations in the Himalayas including Tibet and northeast India indicated a strong bottleneck effect that occurred during a westward and then southward migration of the founding population of Tibeto-Burmans. We, therefore, postulate that the ancient people, who lived in the upper-middle Yellow River basin about 10,000 years ago and developed one of the earliest Neolithic cultures in East Asia, were the ancestors of modern Sino-Tibetan populations.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bing Su
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Chunjie Xiao
    • 1
    • 4
  • Ranjan Deka
    • 5
  • Mark T. Seielstad
    • 6
  • Daoroong Kangwanpong
    • 7
  • Junhua Xiao
    • 2
  • Daru Lu
    • 2
  • Peter Underhill
    • 8
  • Luca Cavalli-Sforza
    • 8
  • Ranajit Chakraborty
    • 1
  • Li Jin
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Human Genetics CenterUniversity of Texas-HoustonHoustonUSA
  2. 2.Institute of Genetics, School of Life SciencesFudan University and Morgan-Tan International Center for Life SciencesShanghaiChina
  3. 3.Kunming Institute of ZoologyChinese Academy of SciencesKunmingChina
  4. 4.Department of BiologyYunnan UniversityKunmingChina
  5. 5.Department of Environmental HealthUniversity of CincinnatiCincinnatiUSA
  6. 6.Program for Population GeneticsHarvard School of Public HealthBostonUSA
  7. 7.Department of BiologyChiang Mai UniversityChiang MaiThailand
  8. 8.Department of GeneticsStanford UniversityStanfordUSA