European Journal of Pediatrics

, Volume 169, Issue 11, pp 1317–1322

Thalassemia and iron deficiency in a group of northeast Thai school children: relationship to the occurrence of anemia

Authors

  • Nichathorn Panomai
    • Graduate SchoolKhon Kaen University
    • Department of NutritionKhon Kaen University
    • Centre for Research and Development of Medical Diagnostic LaboratoriesKhon Kaen University
  • Supawadee Yamsri
    • Graduate SchoolKhon Kaen University
    • Centre for Research and Development of Medical Diagnostic LaboratoriesKhon Kaen University
  • Pattara Sanchaisuriya
    • Department of NutritionKhon Kaen University
  • Goonnapa Fucharoen
    • Centre for Research and Development of Medical Diagnostic LaboratoriesKhon Kaen University
  • Supan Fucharoen
    • Centre for Research and Development of Medical Diagnostic LaboratoriesKhon Kaen University
  • Frank P. Schelp
    • Department of NutritionKhon Kaen University
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00431-010-1218-3

Cite this article as:
Panomai, N., Sanchaisuriya, K., Yamsri, S. et al. Eur J Pediatr (2010) 169: 1317. doi:10.1007/s00431-010-1218-3

Abstract

The cross-sectional study assessed anemia, thalassemia, and hemoglobinopathies, as well as iron deficiency, among 190 northeastern Thai school children aged 10 to 11 years. The aim was to analyze the reasons for anemia among the group. Hemoglobin concentration and other hematological parameters were determined using an automated blood cell counter. Beta-thalassemia and other hemoglobinopathies were identified by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of hemoglobin. Alpha-thalassemia was identified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and related techniques. Iron deficiency was assessed using serum ferritin (SF) <20 ng/ml as indicator. Based on the WHO criteria, anemia was defined by hemoglobin (Hb) level <11.5 g/dl. Twenty five out of 190 children (13.2%; 95% CI = 8.7–18.8%) were anemic. Iron deficiency was found in only two out of 190 children (1.0%; 95% CI = 0.1–3.8%), but the two iron deficient children were not anemic. The proportion of thalassemia and hemoglobinopathies among the group was 61.1% (95% CI = 53.7–68.0%). As underlying reasons for anemia, thalassemia and hemoglobinopathies were found in 22 out of 25 (88.0%) anemic children. Beta-thalassemia and homozygous Hb E seem to be important, while this was less obvious for heterozygous α-thalassemia and heterozygous Hb E. Conclusion: The results suggest that thalassemia and hemoglobinopathies may be major contributing factors to the occurrence of anemia in this area among the children’s population.

Keywords

ThalassemiaHemoglobinopathiesIron deficiencyAnemiaSchool children

Abbreviations

SF

Serum ferritin

CI

Confidence interval

Rbc

Red blood cell

Hb

Hemoglobin

MCV

Mean corpuscular volume

MCH

Mean corpuscular hemoglobin

MCHC

Mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration

RDW

Red blood cell distribution width

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2010