Journal of Neurology

, Volume 245, Issue 10, pp 669–673

Clinimetrics of postural instability in Parkinson’s disease

Authors

  • B. R. Bloem
    • Department of Neurology, Leiden University Medical Centre, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC Leiden, The Netherlands e-mail: bloem@rullf2.medfac.leidenuniv.nl Tel.: +31-71-52623308 Fax: +31-71-5248253
  • Dennis J. Beckley
    • Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, University of California, Davis, USA
  • Bob J. van Hilten
    • Department of Neurology, Leiden University Medical Centre, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC Leiden, The Netherlands e-mail: bloem@rullf2.medfac.leidenuniv.nl Tel.: +31-71-52623308 Fax: +31-71-5248253
  • Raymund A. C. Roos
    • Department of Neurology, Leiden University Medical Centre, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC Leiden, The Netherlands e-mail: bloem@rullf2.medfac.leidenuniv.nl Tel.: +31-71-52623308 Fax: +31-71-5248253
Original communication

DOI: 10.1007/s004150050265

Cite this article as:
Bloem, B., Beckley, D., van Hilten, B. et al. J Neurol (1998) 245: 669. doi:10.1007/s004150050265

Abstract

Judgement of the ability to recover balance after a sudden shoulder pull is used as a clinical measure of postural instability in Parkinson’s disease. To further evaluate its merits, we compared this ‘retropulsion test’ with dynamic posturography in 23 Parkinson patients. Dynamic posturography involved 20 serial ‘toe-up’ support surface rotations, which induced backward body sway. We found a moderate correlation (Spearman’s ρ = 0.54; P < 0.05) between the retropulsion test and body sway after platform rotations during the ‘off’ phase, but no correlation during the ‘on’ phase (Spearman’s ρ = 0.43; P = 0.11). These results cast doubt on the use of the retropulsion test as a measure of postural instability in Parkinson’s disease.

Key words Parkinson’s diseasePostureDynamic posturography

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1998