Effect of administration of high-protein diet in rats submitted to resistance training

  • Thiago da Rosa Lima
  • Eudes Thiago Pereira Ávila
  • Géssica Alves Fraga
  • Mariana de Souza Sena
  • Arlyson Batista de  Souza Dias
  • Paula Caroline de Almeida
  • Joice Cristina dos Santos Trombeta
  • Roberto Carlos Vieira Junior
  • Amílcar Sabino Damazo
  • James Wilfred Navalta
  • Jonato Prestes
  • Fabrício Azevedo Voltarelli
Original Contribution

DOI: 10.1007/s00394-017-1391-5

Cite this article as:
da Rosa Lima, T., Ávila, E.T.P., Fraga, G.A. et al. Eur J Nutr (2017). doi:10.1007/s00394-017-1391-5

Abstract

Purpose

Although there is limited evidence regarding the pathophysiological effects of a high-protein diet (HD), it is believed that this type of diet could overload the body and cause damage to the organs directly involved with protein metabolism and excretion. The aim of this study was to verify the effects of HD on biochemical and morphological parameters of rats that completed a resistance training protocol (RT; aquatic jump) for 8 weeks.

Methods

Thirty-two adult male Wistar rats were divided into four groups (n = 8 for each group): sedentary normal protein diet (SN-14%), sedentary high-protein diet (SH-35%), trained normal protein diet (TN-14%), and trained high-protein diet (TH-35%). Biochemical, tissue, and morphological measurements were made.

Results

Kidney (1.91 ± 0.34) and liver weights (12.88 ± 1.42) were higher in the SH. Soleus muscle weight was higher in the SH (0.22 ± 0.03) when compared to all groups. Blood glucose (123.2 ± 1.8), triglycerides (128.5 ± 44.0), and HDL cholesterol levels (65.7 ± 20.9) were also higher in the SH compared with the other experimental groups. Exercise reduced urea levels in the trained groups TN and TH (31.0 ± 4.1 and 36.8 ± 6.6), respectively. Creatinine levels were lower in TH and SH groups (0.68 ± 0.12; 0.54 ± 0.19), respectively. HD negatively altered renal morphology in SH, but when associated with RT, the apparent damage was partially reversed. In addition, the aquatic jump protocol reversed the damage to the gastrocnemius muscle caused by the HD.

Conclusions

A high-protein diet promoted negative metabolic and morphological changes, while RT was effective in reversing these deleterious effects.

Keywords

Dietary management High-protein diet Resistance training Aquatic jump training Tissue morphology 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thiago da Rosa Lima
    • 1
  • Eudes Thiago Pereira Ávila
    • 1
  • Géssica Alves Fraga
    • 1
  • Mariana de Souza Sena
    • 1
  • Arlyson Batista de  Souza Dias
    • 1
  • Paula Caroline de Almeida
    • 1
  • Joice Cristina dos Santos Trombeta
    • 2
  • Roberto Carlos Vieira Junior
    • 3
  • Amílcar Sabino Damazo
    • 1
  • James Wilfred Navalta
    • 4
  • Jonato Prestes
    • 5
  • Fabrício Azevedo Voltarelli
    • 1
  1. 1.Federal University of Mato GrossoCuiabáBrazil
  2. 2.Mato Grosso State UniversityDiamantinoBrazil
  3. 3.Mato Grosso State UniversityCáceresBrazil
  4. 4.University of Nevada Las VegasLas VegasUSA
  5. 5.Graduation Program on Physical EducationCatholic University of BrasíliaBrasíliaBrazil

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