Applied Physics B

, 122:130

Quantum technology: from research to application

  • Wolfgang P. Schleich
  • Kedar S. Ranade
  • Christian Anton
  • Markus Arndt
  • Markus Aspelmeyer
  • Manfred Bayer
  • Gunnar Berg
  • Tommaso Calarco
  • Harald Fuchs
  • Elisabeth Giacobino
  • Markus Grassl
  • Peter Hänggi
  • Wolfgang M. Heckl
  • Ingolf-Volker Hertel
  • Susana Huelga
  • Fedor Jelezko
  • Bernhard Keimer
  • Jörg P. Kotthaus
  • Gerd Leuchs
  • Norbert Lütkenhaus
  • Ueli Maurer
  • Tilman Pfau
  • Martin B. Plenio
  • Ernst Maria Rasel
  • Ortwin Renn
  • Christine Silberhorn
  • Jörg Schiedmayer
  • Doris Schmitt-Landsiedel
  • Kurt Schönhammer
  • Alexey Ustinov
  • Philip Walther
  • Harald Weinfurter
  • Emo Welzl
  • Roland Wiesendanger
  • Stefan Wolf
  • Anton Zeilinger
  • Peter Zoller
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00340-016-6353-8

Cite this article as:
Schleich, W.P., Ranade, K.S., Anton, C. et al. Appl. Phys. B (2016) 122: 130. doi:10.1007/s00340-016-6353-8
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Quantum Repeaters: From Components to Strategies

Abstract

The term quantum physics refers to the phenomena and characteristics of atomic and subatomic systems which cannot be explained by classical physics. Quantum physics has had a long tradition in Germany, going back nearly 100 years. Quantum physics is the foundation of many modern technologies. The first generation of quantum technology provides the basis for key areas such as semiconductor and laser technology. The “new” quantum technology, based on influencing individual quantum systems, has been the subject of research for about the last 20 years. Quantum technology has great economic potential due to its extensive research programs conducted in specialized quantum technology centres throughout the world. To be a viable and active participant in the economic potential of this field, the research infrastructure in Germany should be improved to facilitate more investigations in quantum technology research.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wolfgang P. Schleich
    • 1
  • Kedar S. Ranade
    • 1
  • Christian Anton
    • 2
  • Markus Arndt
    • 3
  • Markus Aspelmeyer
    • 4
  • Manfred Bayer
    • 5
  • Gunnar Berg
    • 6
  • Tommaso Calarco
    • 7
  • Harald Fuchs
    • 8
  • Elisabeth Giacobino
    • 9
  • Markus Grassl
    • 10
  • Peter Hänggi
    • 11
  • Wolfgang M. Heckl
    • 12
  • Ingolf-Volker Hertel
    • 13
  • Susana Huelga
    • 14
  • Fedor Jelezko
    • 15
  • Bernhard Keimer
    • 16
  • Jörg P. Kotthaus
    • 17
  • Gerd Leuchs
    • 10
  • Norbert Lütkenhaus
    • 18
  • Ueli Maurer
    • 19
  • Tilman Pfau
    • 20
  • Martin B. Plenio
    • 14
  • Ernst Maria Rasel
    • 21
  • Ortwin Renn
    • 22
  • Christine Silberhorn
    • 23
  • Jörg Schiedmayer
    • 24
  • Doris Schmitt-Landsiedel
    • 25
  • Kurt Schönhammer
    • 26
  • Alexey Ustinov
    • 27
  • Philip Walther
    • 28
  • Harald Weinfurter
    • 29
  • Emo Welzl
    • 19
  • Roland Wiesendanger
    • 30
  • Stefan Wolf
    • 31
  • Anton Zeilinger
    • 4
  • Peter Zoller
    • 32
  1. 1.Institut für QuantenphysikUniversität UlmUlmGermany
  2. 2.Department Science-Policy-SocietyGerman National Academy of Sciences LeopoldinaHalleGermany
  3. 3.Faculty of Physics, VCQ & QuNaBioSUniversity of ViennaViennaAustria
  4. 4.Vienna Center for Quantum Science and Technology (VCQ), Faculty of PhysicsUniversity of ViennaViennaAustria
  5. 5.Experimentelle Physik 2Technische Universität DortmundDortmundGermany
  6. 6.Institut für PhysikMartin-Luther-Universität Halle-WittenbergHalleGermany
  7. 7.Institut für Komplexe QuantensystemeUniversität UlmUlmGermany
  8. 8.Physikalisches InstitutWestfälische Wilhelms-Universität MünsterMünsterGermany
  9. 9.Université de ParisParisFrance
  10. 10.Max Planck Institute for the Science of LightErlangenGermany
  11. 11.Institut für PhysikUniversität AugsburgAugsburgGermany
  12. 12.Oskar-von-Miller Lehrstuhl für Wissenschaftskommunikation, School of Education & Physik DepartmentTechnische Universität MünchenMunichGermany
  13. 13.Max-Born-Institut (MBI), im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.VBerlinGermany
  14. 14.Institute of Theoretical PhysicsUniversität UlmUlmGermany
  15. 15.Institut für QuantenoptikUniversität UlmUlmGermany
  16. 16.Max-Planck-Institut für FestkörperforschungStuttgartGermany
  17. 17.Fakultät für Physik and Center for NanoScience (CeNS)Ludwig-Maximilians-UniversitätMunichGermany
  18. 18.Institute for Quantum Computing and Department of Physics & AstronomyUniversity of WaterlooWaterlooCanada
  19. 19.Department of Computer ScienceETH ZurichZurichSwitzerland
  20. 20.Physikalisches Institut and Center for Integrated Quantum Science and TechnologyUniversität StuttgartStuttgartGermany
  21. 21.Institut für QuantenoptikLeibniz-Universität HannoverHannoverGermany
  22. 22.Institut für SozialwissenschaftenUniversität StuttgartStuttgartGermany
  23. 23.Applied PhysicsUniversity of PaderbornPaderbornGermany
  24. 24.Vienna Center for Quantum Science and TechnologyAtominstitut, TU WienViennaAustria
  25. 25.Lehrstuhl für Technische ElektronikTechnische Universität MünchenMunichGermany
  26. 26.Institut für Theoretische PhysikGeorg-August-Universität GöttingenGöttingenGermany
  27. 27.Physikalisches InstitutKarlsruhe Institute of TechnologyKarlsruheGermany
  28. 28.Faculty of PhysicsUniversity of ViennaViennaAustria
  29. 29.Faculty of PhysicsLudwig-Maximilians-UniversitätMunichGermany
  30. 30.Department of PhysicsUniversity of HamburgHamburgGermany
  31. 31.Faculty of InformaticsUniversita della Svizzera ItalianaLuganoSwitzerland
  32. 32.Institute for Theoretical PhysicsUniversity of InnsbruckInnsbruckAustria