Vegetation History and Archaeobotany

, Volume 23, Issue 5, pp 607–613

Forage quality of leaf-fodder from the main broad-leaved woody species and its possible consequences for the Holocene development of forest vegetation in Central Europe

  • Pavla Hejcmanová
  • Michaela Stejskalová
  • Michal Hejcman
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00334-013-0414-2

Cite this article as:
Hejcmanová, P., Stejskalová, M. & Hejcman, M. Veget Hist Archaeobot (2014) 23: 607. doi:10.1007/s00334-013-0414-2

Abstract

Leaf-hay was the principal winter feed of livestock from the Neolithic until the first archaeological records of scythes dated to the Iron Age (700–0 b.c.). Despite the use of meadow hay, leaf-fodder remained an important winter supplement until the present. Archaeological evidence lists Quercus, Tilia, Ulmus, Acer, Fraxinus and Corylus as woody species harvested for leaf-fodder, while Fagus, Populus or Carpinus were rarely used. The aim of our study was to test whether the use of listed woody species followed the pattern of their forage quality (syn. nutritive value). In late May 2012, we collected leaf biomass at four localities in the Czech Republic and determined concentrations of N, P, K, Ca, Mg, neutral- and acid-detergent fibre and lignin. Species with leaves of low forage quality were Carpinus betulus, Fagus sylvatica and Quercus robur, species with leaves of intermediate quality were Corylusavellana and Populus tremula and species with leaves of high quality were Ulmus glabra, Fraxinus excelsior, Tiliacordata and Acer platanoides. Selective browsing and harvesting of high quality species Acer, Fraxinus, Tilia and Ulmus thus probably supported their decline in the Bronze and Iron ages and supported the expansion of Carpinus and Fagus. Our results indicate that our ancestors’ practice of exploiting woody species as leaf-hay for winter fodder followed their nutritive value.

Keywords

Agricultural history Leaf-fodder Livestock feeding Nutritive value Prehistory 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pavla Hejcmanová
    • 1
  • Michaela Stejskalová
    • 2
  • Michal Hejcman
    • 2
  1. 1.Faculty of Tropical AgriSciencesCzech University of Life SciencesPrague 6-SuchdolCzech Republic
  2. 2.Faculty of Environmental SciencesCzech University of Life SciencesPrague 6-SuchdolCzech Republic