Polar Biology

, Volume 28, Issue 7, pp 523–527

Temperature effects on summer growth rates in the Antarctic scallop, Adamussium colbecki

Authors

    • Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research
    • Department of Biological SciencesFlorida Atlantic University
  • Cornelia Honnen
    • Gymnasium Wesermünde
  • Ute Jacob
    • Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research
  • Mariachiara Chiantore
    • DIP.TE.RIS Dipartimento per lo Studio del Territorio e delle sue RisorseUniversità di Genova, Viale Benedetto XV
  • Riccardo Cattaneo-Vietti
    • DIP.TE.RIS Dipartimento per lo Studio del Territorio e delle sue RisorseUniversità di Genova, Viale Benedetto XV
  • Thomas Brey
    • Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00300-005-0716-7

Cite this article as:
Heilmayer, O., Honnen, C., Jacob, U. et al. Polar Biol (2005) 28: 523. doi:10.1007/s00300-005-0716-7

Abstract

Annual growth rates of Antarctic marine organisms are low compared to their relatives from warmer waters. Previous studies hypothesise that high food availability during austral spring–summer may enable Antarctic invertebrates to attain comparatively high short-term growth rates despite the low temperature. Neither a temperature-growth experiment with juvenile Adamussium colbecki (Smith 1902) nor the comparison of A. colbecki summer growth rates with an empirical scallop specific growth-to-temperature relationship could confirm this hypothesis. Hence, summer growth rates of young, immature A. colbecki are strongly affected by temperature, i.e. no “uncoupling” from temperature.

Keywords

Adamussium colbecki Antarctic scallop Growth Growth rate Temperature

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2005