Plant Cell Reports

, Volume 35, Issue 5, pp 1169–1185

Magnaporthe oryzae effectors MoHEG13 and MoHEG16 interfere with host infection and MoHEG13 counteracts cell death caused by Magnaporthe-NLPs in tobacco

  • Valerie Mogga
  • Rhoda Delventhal
  • Denise Weidenbach
  • Samantha Langer
  • Philipp M. Bertram
  • Karsten Andresen
  • Eckhard Thines
  • Thomas Kroj
  • Ulrich Schaffrath
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00299-016-1943-9

Cite this article as:
Mogga, V., Delventhal, R., Weidenbach, D. et al. Plant Cell Rep (2016) 35: 1169. doi:10.1007/s00299-016-1943-9

Abstract

Key message

Adapted pathogens are able to modulate cell responses of their hosts most likely due to the activity of secreted effector molecules thereby enabling colonisation by ostensible nonhost pathogens.

Abstract

It is postulated that host and nonhost pathogens of a given plant species differ in their repertoire of secreted effector molecules that are able to suppress plant resistance. We pursued the strategy of identifying novel effectors of Magnaporthe oryzae, the causal agent of blast disease, by comparing the infection process of closely related host vs. nonhost Magnaporthe species on barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). When both types of pathogen simultaneously attacked the same cell, the nonhost isolate became a successful pathogen possibly due to potent effectors secreted by the host isolate. Microarray studies led to a set of M. oryzae Hypothetical Effector Genes (MoHEGs) which were classified as Early- and LateMoHEGs according to the maximal transcript abundance during colonization of barley. Interestingly, orthologs of these MoHEGs from a nonhost pathogen were similarly regulated when investigated in a host situation, suggesting evolutionary conserved functions. Knockout mutants of MoHEG16 from the group of EarlyMoHEGs were less virulent on barley and microscopic studies revealed an attenuated transition from epidermal to mesophyll colonization. MoHEG13, a LateMoHEG, was shown to antagonize cell death induced by M. oryzae Necrosis-and ethylene-inducing-protein-1 (Nep1)-like proteins in Nicotiana benthamiana. MoHEG13 has a virulence function as a knockout mutant showed attenuated disease progression when inoculated on barley.

Keywords

Magnaporthe oryzae Barley Effector proteins Necrosis 

Supplementary material

299_2016_1943_MOESM1_ESM.docx (18 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 18 kb)
299_2016_1943_MOESM2_ESM.docx (16 kb)
Supplementary material 2 (DOCX 15 kb)
299_2016_1943_MOESM3_ESM.pdf (219 kb)
Supplementary material 3 (PDF 218 kb)
299_2016_1943_MOESM4_ESM.pdf (295 kb)
Supplementary material 4 (PDF 295 kb)
299_2016_1943_MOESM5_ESM.pdf (204 kb)
Supplementary material 5 (PDF 203 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Valerie Mogga
    • 1
  • Rhoda Delventhal
    • 1
  • Denise Weidenbach
    • 1
  • Samantha Langer
    • 1
  • Philipp M. Bertram
    • 1
  • Karsten Andresen
    • 2
  • Eckhard Thines
    • 2
    • 3
  • Thomas Kroj
    • 4
  • Ulrich Schaffrath
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Plant PhysiologyRWTH Aachen UniversityAachenGermany
  2. 2.Institute of Biotechnology and Drug ResearchKaiserslauternGermany
  3. 3.BiotechnologyJohannes Gutenberg-UniversityMainzGermany
  4. 4.INRA, UMR BGPI, Campus International de BaillarguetMontpellier Cedex 5France

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