Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology

, Volume 76, Issue 3, pp 439–445

Role of chemotherapy in the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients who have progressed after abiraterone acetate

  • Roberto Petrioli
  • Edoardo Francini
  • Letizia Laera
  • Anna Ida Fiaschi
  • Roberto Ponchietti
  • Giandomenico Roviello
Review Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00280-015-2803-y

Cite this article as:
Petrioli, R., Francini, E., Laera, L. et al. Cancer Chemother Pharmacol (2015) 76: 439. doi:10.1007/s00280-015-2803-y

Abstract

Abiraterone acetate is a novel irreversible inhibitor of CYP17 that was recently approved for men with post-chemotherapy or chemo-naive castration-resistant prostate cancer. Unfortunately, this agent is not curative, and patients often ultimately develop resistance. However, men who progress after treatment with this new hormonal agent may be considered for another line of chemotherapy-based treatment. In 2004, docetaxel (D) and prednisone were found to improve survival compared with older regimens. More recently, cabazitaxel (C), a novel taxane chemotherapy, has been found to prolong survival in patients who exhibit disease progression during or after D chemotherapy. Here, we review the first clinical studies in which castration-resistant prostate cancer patients received chemotherapy with D or C after progression during abiraterone acetate treatment.

Keywords

Abiraterone acetateDocetaxelCabazitaxelProstate cancer

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roberto Petrioli
    • 1
  • Edoardo Francini
    • 2
  • Letizia Laera
    • 1
  • Anna Ida Fiaschi
    • 3
  • Roberto Ponchietti
    • 4
  • Giandomenico Roviello
    • 1
  1. 1.Medical Oncology Unit, Department of Medicine, Surgery and NeurosciencesUniversity of SienaSienaItaly
  2. 2.Medical Oncology Unit, Policlinico Umberto I HospitalUniversity of RomeRomeItaly
  3. 3.Pharmacology UnitUniversity of SienaSienaItaly
  4. 4.Urological and Andrological Unit, Santa Maria alle Scotte HospitalUniversity of SienaSienaItaly