Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

, Volume 52, Issue 6, pp 741–755

Utilisation of biomass for the supply of energy carriers

Authors

  • P. A. M. Claassen
    • Institute for Agrotechnological Research (ATO-DLO), Industrial (Agro) biotechnology Subdivision, P.O. Box 17, 6700 AA Wageningen, The Netherlands Tel.: +31.317.475000 Fax: +31.317.475347
  • J. B. van Lier
    • Wageningen Agricultural University (WAU), Environmental Technology Subdepartment, P.O. Box 8129, 6700 EV Wageningen, The Netherlands
  • A. M. Lopez Contreras
    • Institute for Agrotechnological Research (ATO-DLO), Industrial (Agro) biotechnology Subdivision, P.O. Box 17, 6700 AA Wageningen, The Netherlands Tel.: +31.317.475000 Fax: +31.317.475347
  • E. W. J. van Niel
    • Wageningen Agricultural University (WAU), Microbiology Laboratory, Hesselink van Suchtelenweg 4, 6703 CT Wageningen, The Netherlands
  • L. Sijtsma
    • Institute for Agrotechnological Research (ATO-DLO), Industrial (Agro) biotechnology Subdivision, P.O. Box 17, 6700 AA Wageningen, The Netherlands Tel.: +31.317.475000 Fax: +31.317.475347
  • A. J. M. Stams
    • Wageningen Agricultural University (WAU), Microbiology Laboratory, Hesselink van Suchtelenweg 4, 6703 CT Wageningen, The Netherlands
  • S. S. de Vries
    • Development of Bioethanol from Agricultural Resources (OBL), P.O. Box 29739, 2502 LS The Hague, The Netherlands
  • R. A. Weusthuis
    • Institute for Agrotechnological Research (ATO-DLO), Industrial (Agro) biotechnology Subdivision, P.O. Box 17, 6700 AA Wageningen, The Netherlands Tel.: +31.317.475000 Fax: +31.317.475347
MINI-REVIEW

DOI: 10.1007/s002530051586

Cite this article as:
Claassen, P., van Lier, J., Lopez Contreras, A. et al. Appl Microbiol Biotechnol (1999) 52: 741. doi:10.1007/s002530051586

Abstract

Because biomass is a widely available, renewable resource, its utilisation for the production of energy has great potential for reducing CO2 emissions and thereby preventing global warming. In this mini-review the `state of the art' of several fermentation processes is discussed, starting with the most advanced process of ethanol production. This is followed by methane production, an established process for waste water purification which is gaining more attention because of the inherent energy production. Subsequently ABE fermentation is discussed and finally the biological production of hydrogen. The last section proposes a new way to assess and compare the different processes by relating their merit to `work content' values and `lost work' instead of the combustion values of their products. It is argued that, especially when dealing with energy from biomass, the application of this methodology will provide a uniform valuation for different processes and products. The described fermentation processes enable the supply of pure energy carriers, either gaseous or liquid, from biomass, yet the introduction of these processes is hampered by two major problems. The first is related to technological shortcomings in the mobilisation of fermentable components from the biomass. The second, having a much greater impact, is linked with socio-economics: until full externality costs are attributed to fossil fuels, accounting for their role in pollution and global warming, the competitiveness of the processes described here will hardly stand a chance.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1999