Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

, Volume 97, Issue 8, pp 3293–3300

Enzyme-based formulations for decontamination: current state and perspectives

  • Navdeep Grover
  • Cerasela Zoica Dinu
  • Ravi S. Kane
  • Jonathan S. Dordick
Mini-Review

DOI: 10.1007/s00253-013-4797-x

Cite this article as:
Grover, N., Dinu, C.Z., Kane, R.S. et al. Appl Microbiol Biotechnol (2013) 97: 3293. doi:10.1007/s00253-013-4797-x

Abstract

Development of noncorrosive, cost-effective, environmentally benign, and broad-spectrum antimicrobial formulations is necessary for clinical, industrial, and domestic purposes. Many current decontaminating formulations are effective, but they require the use of strong oxidizing agents or organic solvents that have deleterious effects on human health and the surrounding environment. The emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens has motivated researchers to develop enzyme-based self-decontaminating formulations as alternatives to such chemical decontamination approaches. Hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes can be used to deactivate pathogens, including bacteria, spores, viruses, and fungi. Laccases, haloperoxidases, and perhydrolases catalyze the generation of biocidal oxidants, such as iodine, bromine, hypohalous acid (e.g., HOCl or HOBr), and peracetic acid. These oxidants have broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. Due to the multi-pathway action of these oxidants, it has proven extremely difficult for microbes to gain resistance. Thus far, few examples have been reported on enzyme-based antimicrobial formulations. For these reasons, various enzyme-containing antimicrobial formulations are highlighted in this review.

Keywords

Decontamination Antimicrobial Laccase Haloperoxidase Perhydrolase Nanocomposites 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Navdeep Grover
    • 1
  • Cerasela Zoica Dinu
    • 2
  • Ravi S. Kane
    • 1
  • Jonathan S. Dordick
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Center for Biotechnology and Interdisciplinary StudiesRensselaer Polytechnic InstituteTroyUSA
  2. 2.Department of Chemical Engineering, Benjamin M. Statler College of Engineering and Mineral ResourcesWest Virginia UniversityMorgantownUSA
  3. 3.Department of Chemical and Biological EngineeringRensselaer Polytechnic InstituteTroyUSA