Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

, Volume 90, Issue 2, pp 745–753

Seasonal variability of bacteria in fine and coarse urban air particulate matter

Authors

    • POLARIS Research Centre, Department of Environmental Sciences (DISAT)University of Milano–Bicocca
  • Isabella Gandolfi
    • POLARIS Research Centre, Department of Environmental Sciences (DISAT)University of Milano–Bicocca
  • Eleonora Gaspari
    • POLARIS Research Centre, Department of Environmental Sciences (DISAT)University of Milano–Bicocca
  • Roberto Ambrosini
    • Department of Biotechnology and BiosciencesUniversity of Milano–Bicocca
  • Giuseppina Bestetti
    • POLARIS Research Centre, Department of Environmental Sciences (DISAT)University of Milano–Bicocca
Environmental Biotechnology

DOI: 10.1007/s00253-010-3048-7

Cite this article as:
Franzetti, A., Gandolfi, I., Gaspari, E. et al. Appl Microbiol Biotechnol (2011) 90: 745. doi:10.1007/s00253-010-3048-7

Abstract

The current knowledge about the microbial communities associated with airborne particulate matter, particularly in urban areas, is limited. This study aims to fill this gap by describing the microbial community associated with coarse (PM10) and fine (PM2.5) particulate matter using pyrosequencing. Particulate matter was sampled on Teflon filters over 3 months in summer and 3 months in winter in Milan (Italy), and the hypervariable V3 region of the gene 16S rRNA amplified from the DNA extracted from the filters. The results showed large seasonal variations in the microbial communities, with plant-associated bacteria dominating in summer and spore-forming bacteria in winter. Bacterial communities from PM10 and PM2.5 were also found to differ from each other by season. In all samples, a high species richness, comparable with that of soils, but a low evenness was found. The results suggest that not only can the sources of the particulate influence the presence of specific bacterial groups but also that environmental factors and stresses can shape the bacterial community.

Keywords

Particulate matterAirborne bacteria

Supplementary material

253_2010_3048_MOESM1_ESM.doc (522 kb)
ESM 1(DOC 522 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2010