Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

, Volume 89, Issue 4, pp 939–948

Production of recombinant proteins and metabolites in yeasts

When are these systems better than bacterial production systems?

Authors

    • Department of Biotechnology and BiosciencesUniversity of Milan Bicocca
  • Brigitte Gasser
    • Department of BiotechnologyUniversity of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna
    • Austrian Centre of Industrial Biotechnology (ACIB GmbH)
  • Tiziana Fossati
    • Department of Biotechnology and BiosciencesUniversity of Milan Bicocca
  • Michael Maurer
    • Department of BiotechnologyUniversity of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna
    • School of BioengineeringUniversity of Applied Sciences FH Campus Wien
  • Paola Branduardi
    • Department of Biotechnology and BiosciencesUniversity of Milan Bicocca
  • Michael Sauer
    • Department of BiotechnologyUniversity of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna
    • Austrian Centre of Industrial Biotechnology (ACIB GmbH)
    • School of BioengineeringUniversity of Applied Sciences FH Campus Wien
  • Diethard Mattanovich
    • Department of BiotechnologyUniversity of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna
    • Austrian Centre of Industrial Biotechnology (ACIB GmbH)
Mini-Review

DOI: 10.1007/s00253-010-3019-z

Cite this article as:
Porro, D., Gasser, B., Fossati, T. et al. Appl Microbiol Biotechnol (2011) 89: 939. doi:10.1007/s00253-010-3019-z

Abstract

Recombinant DNA (rDNA) technologies allow the production of a wide range of peptides, proteins and metabolites from naturally non-producing cells. Since human insulin was the first heterologous compound produced in a laboratory in 1977, rDNA technology has become one of the most important technologies developed in the 20th century. Recombinant protein and metabolites production is a multi-billion dollar market. The development of a new product begins with the choice of the cell factory. The final application of the compound dictates the main criteria that should be taken into consideration: (1) quality, (2) quantity, (3) yield and (4) space time yield of the desired product. Quantity and quality are the most predominant requirements that must be considered for the commercial production of a protein. Quantity and yield are the requirements for the production of a metabolite. Finally, space time yield is crucial for any production process. It therefore becomes clear why the perfect host does not exist yet, and why—despite important advances in rDNA applications in higher eukaryotic cells—microbial biodiversity continues to represent a potential source of attractive cell factories. In this review, we compare the advantages and limitations of the principal yeast and bacterial workhorse systems.

Keywords

Recombinant proteins Recombinant metabolites Bacterial host systems Yeast host systems Industrial biotechnology

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2010