Minireviews

Microbial Ecology

, Volume 59, Issue 1, pp 1-13

Open Access This content is freely available online to anyone, anywhere at any time.

On the Origins of a Vibrio Species

  • Tammi VesthAffiliated withCenter for Biological Sequence Analysis, Department of Systems Biology, The Technical University of Denmark
  • , Trudy M. WassenaarAffiliated withCenter for Biological Sequence Analysis, Department of Systems Biology, The Technical University of DenmarkMolecular Microbiology and Genomics Consultants
  • , Peter F. HallinAffiliated withCenter for Biological Sequence Analysis, Department of Systems Biology, The Technical University of DenmarkNovozymes A/S
  • , Lars SnipenAffiliated withCenter for Biological Sequence Analysis, Department of Systems Biology, The Technical University of DenmarkBiostatistics, Department of Chemistry, Biotechnology, and Food Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences
  • , Karin LagesenAffiliated withCenter for Biological Sequence Analysis, Department of Systems Biology, The Technical University of DenmarkCentre for Molecular Biology and Neuroscience and Institute of Medical Microbiology, University of Oslo
  • , David W. UsseryAffiliated withCenter for Biological Sequence Analysis, Department of Systems Biology, The Technical University of Denmark Email author 

Abstract

Thirty-two genome sequences of various Vibrionaceae members are compared, with emphasis on what makes V. cholerae unique. As few as 1,000 gene families are conserved across all the Vibrionaceae genomes analysed; this fraction roughly doubles for gene families conserved within the species V. cholerae. Of these, approximately 200 gene families that cluster on various locations of the genome are not found in other sequenced Vibrionaceae; these are possibly unique to the V. cholerae species. By comparing gene family content of the analysed genomes, the relatedness to a particular species is identified for two unspeciated genomes. Conversely, two genomes presumably belonging to the same species have suspiciously dissimilar gene family content. We are able to identify a number of genes that are conserved in, and unique to, V. cholerae. Some of these genes may be crucial to the niche adaptation of this species.