Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology

, Volume 34, Issue 2, pp 188–196

Preliminary Observations on Responses of Embryonic and Larval Pacific Herring, Clupea pallasi, to Neutral Fraction Biodegradation Products of Weathered Alaska North Slope Oil

Authors

  • D. P.  Middaugh
    • U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Gulf Ecology Division, 1 Sabine Island Drive, Gulf Breeze, Florida 32561, USA
  • M. E.  Shelton
    • Water Technology and Controls, 642 Tamco Road, Reidsville, North Carolina 27320, USA
  • C. L.  McKenney, Jr.
    • U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Gulf Ecology Division, 1 Sabine Island Drive, Gulf Breeze, Florida 32561, USA
  • G.  Cherr
    • Bodega Marine Laboratory and Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Davis, P.O. Box 247, Bodega Bay, California 94923, USA
  • P. J.  Chapman
    • U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Gulf Ecology Division, 1 Sabine Island Drive, Gulf Breeze, Florida 32561, USA
  • L. A.  Courtney
    • U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Gulf Ecology Division, 1 Sabine Island Drive, Gulf Breeze, Florida 32561, USA

DOI: 10.1007/s002449900303

Cite this article as:
Middaugh, D., Shelton, M., McKenney, Jr., C. et al. Arch. Environ. Contam. Toxicol. (1998) 34: 188. doi:10.1007/s002449900303

Abstract.

Weathered Alaska North Slope crude oil (ANS 521) was subjected to biodegradation in vigorously stirred incubations for 14 days at 15 ± 1°C in 20‰ salinity sterilized seawater, amended with nutrients and inoculated with a hydrocarbon-degrading microorganism (EI2V) isolated from an oil-contaminated beach in Prince William Sound, Alaska. A total of 13.7 mg/L water-soluble neutral fraction (WSF) was recovered from the incubation of weathered ANS 521. Toxicity/teratogenicity tests were conducted with WSF recovered from the biodegradation system using embryonic and larval Pacific herring, Clupea pallasi. Exposures were begun at 4, 48, and 96 h postfertilization of herring eggs. Exposure concentrations were 1, 10, and 100% of the original concentration of WSF recovered from incubations (redissolved in 20‰ salinity sterile seawater at 15 ± 1°C). Sterile 20‰ salinity seawater without the addition of redissolved neutral fraction was used as a control. Significant (p ≤ 0.05) embryo mortality or teratogenic responses were observed at WSF concentrations of 10 and 100%. On days 5 through 8 of embryogenesis, counts of heart contraction rates were significantly lower (p ≤ 0.05) at the 100% WSF concentration for embryos exposed beginning at 4 and 48 h postfertilization. Grow-out of larvae from selected exposures was conducted. High mortality was noted in larvae exposed to the 10% WSF concentration beginning at 4 and 48 h postfertilization. Most of these larvae died 5 to 8 days after hatching when they elicited vertebral displacements at a time concurrent with the onset of feeding behavior.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1998