Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology

, Volume 62, Issue 3, pp 529–538

Arsenic Speciation, Distribution, and Bioaccessibility in Shrews and Their Food

Authors

  • Maeve M. Moriarty
    • Environmental Sciences GroupRoyal Military College of Canada
  • Iris Koch
    • Environmental Sciences GroupRoyal Military College of Canada
    • Environmental Sciences GroupRoyal Military College of Canada
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00244-011-9715-6

Cite this article as:
Moriarty, M.M., Koch, I. & Reimer, K.J. Arch Environ Contam Toxicol (2012) 62: 529. doi:10.1007/s00244-011-9715-6

Abstract

Shrews (Sorex cinereus) collected at a historic mine in Nova Scotia, Canada, had approximately twice the arsenic body burden and 100 times greater daily intake of arsenic compared with shrews from a nearby uncontaminated background site. Shrews store arsenic as inorganic and simple methylated arsenicals. Much of the arsenic associated with their primary food source, i.e., small invertebrates, may be soil adsorbed to their exoskeletons. A physiologically based extraction test estimated that 47 ± 2% of invertebrate arsenic is bioaccessible in the shrew gastrointestinal tract. Overall, shrews appear to be efficient at processing and excreting inorganic arsenic.

Supplementary material

244_2011_9715_MOESM1_ESM.docx (37 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 36 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011