Marine Biology

, Volume 160, Issue 11, pp 2951–2956

Detection of coastal mud odors by loggerhead sea turtles: a possible mechanism for sensing nearby land

Authors

    • Department of BiologyUniversity of North Carolina
  • Kenneth J. Lohmann
    • Department of BiologyUniversity of North Carolina
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00227-013-2285-6

Cite this article as:
Endres, C.S. & Lohmann, K.J. Mar Biol (2013) 160: 2951. doi:10.1007/s00227-013-2285-6

Abstract

For sea turtles, an ability to detect land masses from a considerable distance away, and to distinguish coastal areas from the open sea, might be adaptive. The loggerhead turtle, Caretta caretta, can detect airborne odorants associated with food. To investigate whether sea turtles can also detect odors associated with land, we studied the responses of juvenile loggerheads to odors from coastal mud. Turtles were tested in a water-filled arena in which odorants could be introduced to the air above the water surface. Turtles exposed to air that had passed over a cup containing mud spent more time with their noses out of the water than did control turtles exposed to air that had passed over a cup containing distilled water. The results demonstrate for the first time that loggerheads can detect airborne odorants associated with land, an ability that might play a role in foraging, navigation, or both.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013