, Volume 87, Issue 1, pp 36-43

Adiponectin and Peak Bone Mass in Men: A Cross-Sectional, Population-Based Study

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Abstract

Adiponectin, a protein classically known to be secreted by adipocytes, is also secreted by bone-forming cells. Results of previous studies have been contradictory as to whether serum adiponectin and bone mineral density (BMD) are associated. The aim of this study was to investigate a possible association between serum adiponectin and BMD in young, healthy men at a time of peak bone mass. BMD in the femoral neck, total hip, and lumbar spine were measured in this population-based cross-sectional study of 700 men aged 20–29 years participating in the Odense Androgen Study. Magnetic resonance imaging of femoral cortical thickness and bone marrow size was performed in a subsample of 363 participants. The associations between serum adiponectin and various bone measures were investigated by means of regression analyses with adjustment for potential confounding variables. An inverse association was found between serum adiponectin and total hip BMD and a direct between adiponectin and femoral bone marrow size (r = −0.092; P = 0.036 and r = 0.164; P = 0.003, respectively). Femoral muscle size may, at least in part, explain the association between adiponectin and total hip BMD. Serum adiponectin was inversely associated with total hip BMD in men at the time of peak bone mass, but this association may be explained by factors related to muscle size and function. The observed association between adiponectin and femoral bone marrow size was retained even after adjustment for potential covariates.

B. Abrahamsen has consultant/advisory role in Nycomed, Amgen, and Novartis. All other authors have stated that they have no conflict of interest.