Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry

, Volume 405, Issue 17, pp 5785–5805

Inkjet printed (bio)chemical sensing devices

Authors

  • Nobutoshi Komuro
    • Department of Applied ChemistryKeio University
  • Shunsuke Takaki
    • Department of Applied ChemistryKeio University
  • Koji Suzuki
    • Department of Applied ChemistryKeio University
    • Department of Applied ChemistryKeio University
Review

DOI: 10.1007/s00216-013-7013-z

Cite this article as:
Komuro, N., Takaki, S., Suzuki, K. et al. Anal Bioanal Chem (2013) 405: 5785. doi:10.1007/s00216-013-7013-z

Abstract

Inkjet printing has evolved from an office printing application to become an important tool in industrial mass fabrication. In parallel, this technology is increasingly used in research laboratories around the world for the fabrication of entire (bio)chemical sensing devices or single functional elements of such devices. Regularly stated characteristics of inkjet printing making it attractive to replace an alternative material deposition method are low cost, simplicity, high resolution, speed, reproducibility, flexibility, non-contact, and low amount of waste generated. With this review, we give an overview over areas of (bio)chemical sensing device development profiting from inkjet printing applications. A variety of printable functional sensor elements are introduced by examples, and the advantages and challenges of the inkjet method are pointed out. It is demonstrated that inkjet printing is already a routine tool for the fabrication of some (bio)chemical sensing devices, but also that novel applications are being continuously developed. Finally, some inherent limitations of the method and challenges for the further exploitation of this technology are pointed out.

Keywords

Inkjet printingScreen printingElectrodesConducting polymersMicrofluidic paper-based analytical devices

Abbreviations

DBSA

Dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid

DOD

Drop-on-demand

HRP

Horseradish peroxidase

LbL

Layer-by-layer

LED

Light emitting diode

LOD

Limit of detection

ODF

Oligodeoxyfluoroside

PANI

Polyaniline

PEDOT-PSS

Poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate)

SERS

Surface enhanced Raman scattering

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013